White Dwarf Life Cycle what a white dwarf is Life White Dwarf Cycle

White Dwarf Life Cycle what a white dwarf is Life White Dwarf Cycle

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Of course the moon does not magically turn blue in color. But there are some meteorological phenomena or environmental causes that may make the moon appear blue. These include such things as volcanic ash from any large eruption, fine grains of sand or ice crystals suspended in the atmosphere or even from the smoke of large bush fires. Also, if you have been snug in your cottage under an oil lamp and go outside to look at the moon, it will appear blue. This is because our optical organs are governed by an automatic response to 'white balances' much like that of a digital camera, and it will take a moment for your eyes to adjust from being in 'yellow' light.



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But ongoing studies about lunar chemistry are showing that it may be much wetter than planetary scientists initially hypothesized. In fact, these wetter conditions conflict with some aspects of the Giant Impact theory.



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The Giant-Impact Theory, alternatively termed the Theia Impact, or Big Splash Theory, proposes that Earth's Moon was born from the debris remaining from a catastrophic collision, that occurred about 4.3 billion years ago, between the primordial Earth and an unfortunate protoplanet, that was about the size of Mars. The Earth's Moon-forming collision would have occurred when our Solar System was still forming during the Hadean eon. The Hadean eon occurred about 20 to 100 million years after our Solar System emerged from its frigid, dark natal cloud of gas and dust. The doomed impacting protoplanet, often called Theia, received its name in honor of a Titan in Greek mythology who was the mother of Selene, the Moon goddess. An analysis of lunar rocks, published in 2016, indicates that this catastrophic crash was a direct hit--causing a thorough mixing of both Earth-stuff and Theia-stuff. The Giant-Impact Theory is the favored scientific explanation for the birth of Earth's Moon.

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The most popular theory of lunar formation suggests that the Moon was born in a monumental collision between a Mars-size object named Theia and the ancient Earth--and that this ancient smash-up would have melted our primordial planet. This model further suggests that more than 40 percent of Earth's Moon is composed of the debris of the tragedy that was Theia. However, more recent theories indicate that our planet suffered from several giant collisions during its formation, with the lunar-forming crash being the last great grand finale event.



Research presented on October 19, 2012, at the annual meeting of the American Astronomical Society's Division for Planetary Sciences held in Reno, Nevada, has suggested a causal relationship between the seven sister moons--Titan and the six mid-sized icy moons of Saturn. The researchers suggest that the seven moons have a violent origin, and came into being when a few considerably larger moons crashed into each other to give birth to the misty, moisty moon, Titan.



"Our model explains the diversity of these ice-rich moons and the evidence for their very active geology and dynamics. It also explains a puzzling fact about Titan, in that a giant impact would give it a high orbital eccentricity," Asphaug continued to explain to the press on October 18, 2012.

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