Space Shuttle Wiring transferred space shuttle pinball wiring harness from old Shuttle Wiring Space

Space Shuttle Wiring transferred space shuttle pinball wiring harness from old Shuttle Wiring Space

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It is important to know at any age!

Moon jellyfish (Aurelia aurita) are from the phylum Cnidaria. This phylum contains over 9,000 aquatic species. There are 10 nearly identical species in the genus Aurelia collectively referred to as moon jellyfish. In fact, they are so close morphologically that it takes DNA testing to distinguish one species from another.



and here is another

"That thermally emitted radiation happens at the same wavelengths that we need to use to look for water. So in order to say with any confidence that water is present, we first need to account for and remove the thermally emitted component," Dr. Milliken continued to explain in the July 24, 2017 Brown University Press Release.



and finally

Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.

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However, the theory that has long been held to be the most likely explanation is the giant impact theory, suggesting that the Mars-sized body named Theia smashed into the ancient Earth billions of years ago. The monumental blast resulted in a portion of the primordial Earth's crust to be hurled off screaming into Space. This ancient catastrophe tossed a multitude of somersaulting moonlets into the sky, and some of this material was ultimately captured into orbit around the ancient Earth about 4.5 billion years ago, where it finally was pulled together by the force of gravity to become the Moon.



By studying how the four inner planets evolved and grew--using more than 250 computer simulations--the planetary scientists discovered that if the Moon-birthing blast had happened early, the quantity of material accreted onto Earth afterward would be enormous. If the impact had occurred late, the amount of material would be relatively small.



Dr. Jacobson believes that this new study showing a later lunar birthday means that our planet's impact history was more turbulent than earlier thought. The alteration in Earth's bombardment rate, he suggests, also means an alteration in the quantity of energy that went into our planet's oceans and atmosphere. It also has implications for the history of our planet's surface temperature--which is important because liquid water could not exist until the surface had cooled off sufficiently.