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It is important to know at any age!

Most of the moons dwelling in our Sun's family were probably born from primordial disks of dust and gas, orbiting around newly formed planets, when our Solar System was very young about 4.5 billion years ago. There are at least 150 moons circling the planets in our Solar System--and about 25 moons are currently awaiting official confirmation of their discovery.



and here is another

Triton and Pluto share roughly the same bulk composition and density, as well as similar atmospheres. In addition, both remote bodies move in unusual orbits. Pluto has a highly eccentric orbit, and is sometimes closer to the Sun than Neptune! Furthermore, Pluto orbits in the opposite direction around our Sun than do the eight major planets of our Solar System. Triton revolves around Neptune in a direction counter to that of its planet--and its retrograde orbit indicates that it is a captured object. Because of the unusual nature of both Triton's and Pluto's orbits, as well as the similarities of their bulk properties and atmospheres, it has long been thought that there is some sort of historical connection between them. Indeed, it was once thought that Pluto was an escaped moon of Neptune, but this is now considered unlikely. It is much more likely that long ago Triton, like Pluto, circled the Sun independently, but was unluckily captured by its adoptive planet--whereas Pluto was left to wander freely.



and finally

Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our Solar System, and the only world beyond our own that we have walked upon, leaving our footprints behind in moon dust as a silent testimony that once we existed, and had been there. Our Moon is both the brightest and largest object in Earth's night sky, and many astronomers think that our bewitching lunar companion was born as a result of an ancient collision between our planet and an ill-fated Mars-sized protoplanet that has been named Theia. There are other theories that have been devised to explain our Moon's origin, but the Giant Impact theory is considered to be the best explanation. When the doomed Theia blasted into the primordial Earth, it launched into the sky above our planet the debris resulting from that catastrophic crash. The debris eventually coalesced into Earth's Moon.

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In addition to shedding new light on the lunar water-mystery, the new research could also have important implications for future exploration of Earth's Moon. The volcanic beads do not harbor a lot of water--only about.05 percent by weight--but the deposits are large, and the water could potentially be extracted.



Planetary scientists usually calculate the Moon's age by using the radioactive decay of elements like uranium, explained Dr. John Chambers in the April 2, 2014 National Geographic News. Dr. Chambers is a planetary scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C. By studying an element with a recognized decay rate, and knowing its concentration in Moon rocks or the Earth's surface, scientists are able to calculate back in time to when the material first formed. However, there are numerous and varying radioactive materials that can provide differing timelines, added Dr. Chambers, who was not involved in the study.



Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.