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Solar System Coloring Worksheets Free printable solar system coloring sheets for kids Free Solar System Coloring Worksheets

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It is important to know at any age!

Neptune is circled by only 14 moons, a considerably smaller number than Jupiter's 70. Also, most of Neptune's moons are extremely small. Triton, however, is an exception. In fact, Triton harbors 99.7% of the mass of Neptune's entire system of moons combined. The second-largest irregular moon in our Solar System, Phoebe of Saturn, sports only about 0.03% of Triton's mass. It is thought that Triton was snared by its adopted parent-planet some time after Neptune had already formed a system of moons. This means that the capture of the wandering Triton was likely a catastrophic event for Neptune's original moons, disrupting their orbits, and causing them to blast into each other--thus creating a rubble disc.



and here is another

They are prominent in the shallow coastal waters of estuaries and harbors which explains their abundance in what is still an infant branch within the larger saltwater aquarium trade industry. Because they are common in both temperate and tropical waters, they can tolerate temperature ranges anywhere between 42-88 F (6-31 C). Although they can survive in brackish water, a salinity level (specific gravity) of 1.023 will mimic their native marine environment.



and finally

Astronomers suspected for a very long time that Triton was not born a moon of Neptune, but was instead a luckless refugee from elsewhere that had been kidnapped by its planet. It was not until 2006, however, that a convincing theory explaining how Triton was ensnared by its adoptive parent was proposed. This theory suggests that Triton once had a companion as it orbited the Sun. According to this scenario, Neptune's strong gravitational embrace tugged Triton away from its sister world. This research was reported in the May 11, 2006 issue of the journal Nature.

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Some of the images focus on the shallow center of a bizarre impact crater dubbed Pwyll. Impact rays and shattered pieces of material scattered over an immense area of the moon tell the tale of a sizeable meteorite that collided violently with Europa relatively recently--"only" about 10 to 100 million years ago. There is also darker debris chaotically scattered around Pwyll. This further suggests that the large crashing meteorite may have dug up some deeply buried material, and tossed it helter-skelter around the crater.



Discovering the water content of volcanic deposits on our Moon using orbital instruments presents quite a challenge. Planetary scientists use orbital spectrometers to measure the light that skips off of a planetary surface. By determining which electromagnetic wavelengths of light are reflected or absorbed by the surface, the scientists can then get an idea of which minerals and other compounds are present.



"How can this be? Is it just a matter of size? Location? What about Mercury and Venus? Did they grow on similar timescales to the Earth or on timescales more similar to Mars? I think these are some of the really important questions that we, as a community of planetary scientists, will be addressing in the future," Dr. Jacobson told the press in April 2014.