Sirius Star Cluster star size starship in the sirius star cluster 20 12 2014 Star Sirius Cluster

Sirius Star Cluster star size starship in the sirius star cluster 20 12 2014 Star Sirius Cluster

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"We've found a likely solution to the long-standing problem of how Triton arrived in its peculiar orbit. In addition, this mechanism introduces a new pathway for the capture of satellites by planets that may be relevant to other objects in the Solar System," explained Dr. Craig Agnor, a researcher from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the May 10, 2006 issue of Time Magazine.



and here is another

Saturn, along with its frozen retinue of icy rings, dazzling moons, and sparkling moonlets, orbits our Sun about ten times farther out than the Earth. Astronomers received their first collection of detailed data about Titan when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander arrived there in 2004. The Huygens lander successfully obtained revealing images when it drifted down to Titan's tormented, hydrocarbon-slashed surface, as well as when it was still floating slowly and softly down through the moon's thick, foggy, orange atmosphere--which has 1.4 times greater pressure than that of our own planet. These pictures, when combined with other studies using instruments aboard the Cassini orbiter, reveal to curious planetary scientists that Titan's geological features include lakes and river channels filled with methane, ethane, and propane. Titan's strange surface also shows mountains and sand dunes--and it is pockmarked by craters. The rippling dunes form when fierce winds sweep up loose particles from the surface and then tosses them downwind. However, the sands of Titan are not like the sands on our Earth. Titan's "sand" is both bizarre and alien, probably composed of very small particles of solid hydrocarbons--or, possibly, ice imprisoned within hydrocarbons--with a density of about one-third that of the sand on our own planet. Furthermore, Titan's gravity is low. In fact, it is only approximately one-seventh that of Earth. This means that, working in combination with the low density of Titan's sand particles, they carry only the small weight of a mere four percent that of terrestrial sand. Titan's "sand" is about the same light-weight as freeze-dried grains of coffee!



and finally

Europa is the sixth largest moon in our Solar System, and few bodies have enticed astronomers as much as this little moon of Jupiter, because it is thought to sport a subsurface global ocean of liquid water--and where there is water, there is the possibility of life. The more astronomers learn about this fascinating and mysterious icy moon, the more they become enchanted with it.

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Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our Solar System, and the only world beyond our own that we have walked upon, leaving our footprints behind in moon dust as a silent testimony that once we existed, and had been there. Our Moon is both the brightest and largest object in Earth's night sky, and many astronomers think that our bewitching lunar companion was born as a result of an ancient collision between our planet and an ill-fated Mars-sized protoplanet that has been named Theia. There are other theories that have been devised to explain our Moon's origin, but the Giant Impact theory is considered to be the best explanation. When the doomed Theia blasted into the primordial Earth, it launched into the sky above our planet the debris resulting from that catastrophic crash. The debris eventually coalesced into Earth's Moon.



However, Earth's Moon presents a special problem because its surface becomes increasingly hotter and hotter over the course of a day. Alas, this is especially true at latitudes where the pyroclastic deposits are located. This means that in addition to the light reflected from the lunar surface, the spectrometer also winds up measuring heat.



For a very long time, planetary scientists favored the scenario that the duo of potato-shaped Martian moons were probably snared asteroids. However, the pair's circular orbits at the equator indicated otherwise. The orbits of the little moons suggested that they had really formed from a giant impact billions of years ago. The new research, published in the July 4, 2016 issue of Nature Geoscience, proposes that a massive 2,000 kilometer protoplanet crashed into the primordial Mars. The horrendous impact resurfaced most of the Martian surface and hurled a mass of debris, more than 100 times the mass of both Phobos and Deimos, into orbit around the Red Planet.