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If the authors' proposal is correct, then it successfully explains why Neptune's moon system looks so strange compared to Jupiter's or Saturn's--which means that astronomers' models of how these primordial systems form around gaseous giant worlds still hold strong.



and here is another

You see, when the moon looks a certain way, that's called a phase, and certain phases of the moon mean that fish are more active. That means if you spend time on the water fishing, you'll be more successful simply due to the fact that the moon is in a certain phase. I realize how strange this may sound to some of you, but it's nonetheless true. Simply spending your fishing time fishing when the moon is Full or New will have a dramatic result on your catch rates.



and finally

Titan's alien climate--including its heavy hydrocarbon rain and fierce winds--forms surface features that are similar to those on Earth, and it experiences seasonal weather changes--just like our own planet. In fact, with its liquids pooling both on its surface and beneath its surface, along with its mostly nitrogen atmosphere, Titan has a methane cycle that is comparable to Earth's water cycle--although at the much more frosty temperature of about -179.2 degrees Celsius.

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Methane and nitrogen present in Titan's atmosphere react together to create a variety of organic materials. Many planetary scientists think the heaviest materials somersault down to the surface of hydrocarbon-slashed Titan. Dr. Le Gall and her team propose that when those compounds splash into the sea, either by directly falling from the air as hydrocarbon rain, or through Titan's rivers, some are dissolved in the liquid methane. The compounds that do not dissolve, such as nitrites and benzene, sink down into the floor of this exotic sea.



Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.



Until 2004, no spacecraft had visited Saturn in over two decades. Pioneer 11 had snapped the very first close-up images of Saturn when it flew past in 1979, Voyager 1 had its rendezvous about a year later, and in August 1981 Voyager 2 had its brief but highly productive encounter. At last, on July 1, 2004, NASA's Cassini spacecraft went into orbit around Saturn, and started taking breathtaking photographs.