Planetary Nebula M2 9 m2 9 twin jet nebula astronomy news M2 Planetary 9 Nebula

Planetary Nebula M2 9 m2 9 twin jet nebula astronomy news M2 Planetary 9 Nebula

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A little interesting about space life.

The moon's internal geological structure is very strange and unique. It has vast areas of hollow underground caves. This is because the moon passed through boiling and molten states before it cooled down to its stable present day temperature. Some caves are miles and miles in length and breath. These caves exist at varying depths below the moon's surface. Almost all the caves are internally connected to each other and it is possible to trace many paths through interconnected caves to fully 'circumnavigate' the moon without ever stepping out on to its outer surface. The tops of the caves that form the crust of the moon's surface are supported on massive vertical rock pillars that rise out of the bottom surface. These vertical support structures are very hard and rocklike and naturally contoured in shell like formations endowing them with heavy load bearing capabilities. To visualize the interior of these caves a comparable earth structure would be the NFL football domes. They would compare in size with some of the smaller caves but none of the caves in the moon are formed in a particular shape, pattern, length, breadth or height, and are quite irregular in shape. Surface terrain is also to a large extent irregular and variable.



and here is another

An orbiting spacecraft sporting such an ice-piercing radar is necessary to confirm and map Europa's enormous lake. NASA is considering such a mission, proposed to launch sometime before 2022.



and finally

Our Moon's temperature reaches about 260 degrees Fahrenheit when under a full Sun. However, in darkness, the temperature dives down to approximately -280 degrees Fahrenheit.

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When a moon is in an orbit around its parent-planet, all is well--just as long as the gravity that is holding the moon together in one piece exceeds the powerful, relentless pull of its planet. Alas, if a moon wanders too close, and the tidal forces of the parent-planet exceed the gravitational bind of the unlucky moon, the moon will fall apart. This is termed the Roche limit. Earth's relatively large Moon is a very fortunate natural satellite, and the limit here is a bit under 10,000 kilometers--while our Moon is a safe 385,000 kilometers away from our planet.



Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.



This model attempts to explain the distribution of moons circling giant, gaseous planets dwelling in the outer limits of our Solar System. However, it also provides an explanation for how the moons of planets such as our Earth and the dwarf planet, Pluto, were born. This research provides a valuable clue about how planetary systems developed throughout the entire Universe--not only in our own Solar System.