Planet Mercury Project Ideas solar system unit inner planets Project Planet Mercury Ideas

Planet Mercury Project Ideas solar system unit inner planets Project Planet Mercury Ideas

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A little interesting about space life.

When Apollo 11 landed on the Moon in 1969, we were presented with our first human contact with the moon. The mission was able to accomplish the task of not only landing on the Moon, but also to return to the Earth with samples from the Moon. These samples along with subsequent presented us with answers regarding the composition of the Moon, which also gave us some basic facts that any theory about how the moon was created must answer/address. We learned:The Moon does not contain an iron core like our Earth does, due to the fact that the Moon's density is only 3.34 grams per cubic centimeter (compared to the Earth's which is 5.52 grams per cubic centimeter).Samples collected from the surface of the Moon reveal that it underwent extreme heat and baking, much more than what the Earth experienced.



and here is another

It may be known fact that there is moon influence onto the tidal waves of the sea but it is never logic to make it applicable on human body. Those who claim this support their saying with the point that human body is mostly occupied by water hence the force should affect human's behavior as well. This is erroneous and has no scientific proofs. A valid explanation is that the moon affects the Earth's unbounded collection of water surface but water in the human body is completely covered, it is totally ridiculous to say the moon can direct the force through the skin into the body then impinge on the human's individual character.



and finally

Astronomers' current understanding of giant-planet birth predicts an episode of gas accretion that ultimately builds up the enormous size of these gaseous behemoths. According to theory, circumplanetary gas disks, that surround the forming planets during this early period, eventually become the strange nurseries that produce a giant planet's system of moons, thus creating systems of co-planar and prograde (orbiting in the same direction as the planet) natural satellites in a way similar to the many moons of Jupiter and Saturn.

More information:

"Their motion is tied together in a way similar to that of three of Jupiter's large moons. If you were sitting on Nix, you would see Styx go around Pluto twice every time Hydra goes around three times," Dr. Hamilton commented in the June 3, 2015 HST Press Release.



Moons can be found in a rich assortment of various sizes, shapes, and types. Although they are generally solid little worlds, a few of them are known to sport atmospheres. Indeed, the atmosphere of the second largest moon in our Solar System, Titan of Saturn, is so dense that it hides Titan's strange hydrocarbon-slashed surface beneath a thick orange veil.



In order to spot such a remote exomoon, the authors of this new study, The Hunt for Exomoons with Kepler (HEK): III. The First Search for an Exomoon around a Habitable-Zone Planet, used a technique that models the dips and features of the parent star's light-curve (stellar brightness vs. time), which are caused by transits of the planet (and any accompanying moons) in front of the face of its star. This is a complicated and difficult endeavor because numerous and diverse models of planet-moon dynamics must be taken into consideration. Each one of these models possesses parameters that describe physical properties belonging to the planet or moon, as well as parameters describing the orbital system. The authors use what is termed Bayesian statistics to account for the fact that the true orbital model of this planetary system is still not known--and this enables them to calculate if a model with our without a moon fits the observed light-curve the best.