Planet Mercury Project Ideas make a science fair project poster ideas jupiter Planet Project Ideas Mercury

Planet Mercury Project Ideas make a science fair project poster ideas jupiter Planet Project Ideas Mercury

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A little interesting about space life.

They believed that heaven was a community based place without a leader, or elders, and that it had a social structure identical to the one they enjoyed in the moon. They did not have a concept of "Hell" and probably did not have a word meaning "sin" or any word with a meaning even slightly resembling it. Words such as sin, cruelty, evil, jealousy, anger, crime, fight, aggression, war, etc., were totally unknown to the moon people.



and here is another

Triton and Pluto share roughly the same bulk composition and density, as well as similar atmospheres. In addition, both remote bodies move in unusual orbits. Pluto has a highly eccentric orbit, and is sometimes closer to the Sun than Neptune! Furthermore, Pluto orbits in the opposite direction around our Sun than do the eight major planets of our Solar System. Triton revolves around Neptune in a direction counter to that of its planet--and its retrograde orbit indicates that it is a captured object. Because of the unusual nature of both Triton's and Pluto's orbits, as well as the similarities of their bulk properties and atmospheres, it has long been thought that there is some sort of historical connection between them. Indeed, it was once thought that Pluto was an escaped moon of Neptune, but this is now considered unlikely. It is much more likely that long ago Triton, like Pluto, circled the Sun independently, but was unluckily captured by its adoptive planet--whereas Pluto was left to wander freely.



and finally

But ongoing studies about lunar chemistry are showing that it may be much wetter than planetary scientists initially hypothesized. In fact, these wetter conditions conflict with some aspects of the Giant Impact theory.

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Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our entire Solar System, as well as the only world beyond our planet that we have visited. Our lunar companion is the largest and brightest object in the sky at night, and many astronomers think that it was born when the tragedy that was the pulverized Theia blasted into ancient Earth billions of years ago. There are other theories, however, that seek to explain how our Moon came to be. Nevertheless, the Giant Impact theory stands its ground as the most credible explanation for lunar birth. When the doomed, destroyed Theia impacted Earth, it shot debris above our planet. This abundant debris eventually coalesced to form our Moon.



"The distribution of these water-rich deposits is the key thing. They're spread across the surface, which tells us that the water found in the Apollo samples isn't a one-off. Lunar pyroclastics seem to be universally water-rich, which suggests the same may be true of the mantle," Dr. Milliken continued to explain in the Brown University Press Release.



There is an important distinction between the way giant planet systems form--such as those belonging to Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune--and the way that the rocky planets such as Earth, and the dwarf planet, Pluto, take shape. The gaseous giant planets are surrounded by rings, a myriad of moons, and a vast number of tiny dancing moonlets, whereas the rocky planets have none, or only one moon, and no rings to be seen. Until this new model was developed, two scenarios were generally used to explain how the regular moons of our Solar System were born. These two commonly used explanations suggest that the moons of Earth and Pluto came into being following catastrophic impacts. They further suggest that the moons of the giant, outer planets were born in a nebula floating around the newborn gigantic planet. They fail, however, to explain the distribution and chemical composition of the moons circling the gigantic outer four. Something, therefore, up until now, has been missing.