Planet Mercury Project Ideas make a science fair project about mercury planet outer Project Ideas Planet Mercury

Planet Mercury Project Ideas make a science fair project about mercury planet outer Project Ideas Planet Mercury

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A little interesting about space life.

They are prominent in the shallow coastal waters of estuaries and harbors which explains their abundance in what is still an infant branch within the larger saltwater aquarium trade industry. Because they are common in both temperate and tropical waters, they can tolerate temperature ranges anywhere between 42-88 F (6-31 C). Although they can survive in brackish water, a salinity level (specific gravity) of 1.023 will mimic their native marine environment.



and here is another

Dr. Alice Le Gall commented in the same JPL Press Release that "Before Cassini, we expected to find that Ligeia Mare would be mostly made up of ethane, which is produced in abundance in the atmosphere when sunlight breaks methane molecules apart. Instead, this sea is predominantly made of pure methane." Dr. Le Gall, a Cassini radar team associate, is of the French research laboratory LATMOS, in Paris, and lead author of the new study.



and finally

In their research, the planetary scientists combined several radar observations of heat given off by Ligeia Mare. They also studied data collected from a 2013 experiment that bounced radio signals off Ligeia Mare. The results of that experiment were presented in a 2014 paper led by Cassini radar team associate Dr. Marco Mastroguiseppe of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, who also was part of the new study.

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Europa, an icy little moon that circles the giant planet Jupiter, probably sustains a global ocean of liquid water beneath a tortured, shattered icy crust. For a long time, weird and jumbled regions of ice disruption, called "chaos terrains", were seen only on Europa, and their origins remained cloaked in mystery. But astronomers now think that the "chaos terrains" formed as the result of a subsurface liquid saltwater lake, equal to all of the Great Lakes on Earth combined. Hidden about 1.9 miles beneath Europa's cracked eggshell-like frozen crust, the ice-embedded lake may be one of the latest potentially habitable environments discovered so far in our Solar System.



Our Moon makes a complete orbit around Earth in 27 Earth days and it rotates (spins) at that same rate--meaning, in that same amount of time. Because our planet is also moving--rotating on its axis as it circles our Star--from our viewpoint, our lunar companion appears to circle us ever 29 days.



Astronomers have for years contemplated two competing hypotheses explaining the origin of the Martian moons. The first proposes that Phobos and Deimos are, indeed, escapees from the Main Asteroid Belt. Alas, this viewpoint begs the question of why they should have been so cruelly captured by their adopted parent-planet in the first place. An alternative theory points to the possibility that the moons were born from the debris left by a violent collision between Mars and a primordial protoplanet--a baby planet still under construction. However, this theory also suffers from uncertainty because it does not explain precisely how this particular tragic mechanism gave rise to Phobos and Deimos.