Planet Mercury Project Ideas just add laughter science project solar system Project Mercury Ideas Planet

Planet Mercury Project Ideas just add laughter science project solar system Project Mercury Ideas Planet

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A little interesting about space life.

How did Triton acquire so many strange properties, and why is Neptune's system of satellites so different from those predicted for a gaseous giant planet? Two planetary scientists, Dr. Raluca Rufu (Weizmann Institute of Science, Israel) and Dr. Robin Canup (Southwest Research Institute, US) demonstrate how Triton wreaked catastrophic havoc on Neptune's first generation of very unfortunate moons.



and here is another

For this reason, for many years astronomers considered the possibility that hydrocarbon lakes and seas might exist on this fantastic moon-world. Data that finally arrived courtesy of the joint NASA and European Space Agency's (ESA's) Cassini-Huygens mission lived up to their expectations. Since arriving at the Saturn system in 2004, the Cassini spacecraft has revealed more than 620,000 square miles of Titan's long-hidden, bewildering surface--and it has shown that almost two percent of Titan's entire surface is covered in liquid.



and finally

Until 1610, when Galileo Galilei discovered the quartet of large Galilean moons orbiting Jupiter--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--Earth's Moon was the Moon, because it was the only moon known to exist. Now, we know differently. There are over 100 known moons in our Solar System alone, and probably many, many more, circling distant alien planets belonging to the families of stars beyond our Sun. Most of the moons in our own Solar System are relatively small, icy worldlets that contain only small amounts of rocky material. The faraway multitude of sparkling, frozen moons that inhabit our Sun's family are mostly found circling the quartet of outer gaseous giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In this dimly lit region, far from our Star's heat and light, these tiny icy moons perform a strange and lovely ballet around their large, gaseous host planets. The quartet of giant gaseous planets, that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs, are enshrouded by heavy atmospheres of gas, and they are accompanied in their travels around our Sun, by their own orbiting entourage of moons and moonlets.

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Ever since their discovery in 1877, Phobos and Deimos have both bewildered and bewitched astronomers trying to answer the question of how Mars ended up with its duo of misshapen little moons. However, this perplexing riddle might have been solved by a multidisciplinary study conducted by French, Belgian, and Japanese scientists.



The Giant-Impact Theory, alternatively termed the Theia Impact, or Big Splash Theory, proposes that Earth's Moon was born from the debris remaining from a catastrophic collision, that occurred about 4.3 billion years ago, between the primordial Earth and an unfortunate protoplanet, that was about the size of Mars. The Earth's Moon-forming collision would have occurred when our Solar System was still forming during the Hadean eon. The Hadean eon occurred about 20 to 100 million years after our Solar System emerged from its frigid, dark natal cloud of gas and dust. The doomed impacting protoplanet, often called Theia, received its name in honor of a Titan in Greek mythology who was the mother of Selene, the Moon goddess. An analysis of lunar rocks, published in 2016, indicates that this catastrophic crash was a direct hit--causing a thorough mixing of both Earth-stuff and Theia-stuff. The Giant-Impact Theory is the favored scientific explanation for the birth of Earth's Moon.



Asphaug and co-author Dr. Andreas Reufer of the University of Bern in Switzerland, devised their new giant impact model using sophisticated computer simulations. They discovered that mergers between moons the size of Jupiter's Galilean satellites--which range in size from 1,940 miles wide (Europa) to 3, 271 miles across (Ganymede)--would tear icy stuff off the outer layers of the colliding moons. This icy material would then form spiral arms, which would ultimately merge together due to gravitational attraction to create Saturn's mid-sized icy moons.