Planet Mercury Project Ideas fun planet mercury facts for kids learning science Ideas Project Planet Mercury

Planet Mercury Project Ideas fun planet mercury facts for kids learning science Ideas Project Planet Mercury

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A little interesting about space life.

The truth is that Pluto's large moon Charon is a freak. Pluto and Charon do not behave like a "normal" planet-and-moon duo. In fact, the system is unique in our Solar System because the two small, icy worlds face each other and spin together around a fixed point. For this reason, many planetary scientists have suggested that Pluto and Charon actually form a binary system--rather than that of a moon and planet pair. The new research shows that the chaotic movements of Pluto's smaller moons are caused by this weird Pluto-Charon relationship.



and here is another

Well, if you remember correctly I have mentioned that in Kason water is in more than one way important to the Burmese. And water is the subject of anticipation. Burmese farmers put it into the following words: "Water in the ponds recedes in Tagu and the whole land is parched in Kason."



and finally

Until 1610, when Galileo Galilei discovered the quartet of large Galilean moons orbiting Jupiter--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--Earth's Moon was the Moon, because it was the only moon known to exist. Now, we know differently. There are over 100 known moons in our Solar System alone, and probably many, many more, circling distant alien planets belonging to the families of stars beyond our Sun. Most of the moons in our own Solar System are relatively small, icy worldlets that contain only small amounts of rocky material. The faraway multitude of sparkling, frozen moons that inhabit our Sun's family are mostly found circling the quartet of outer gaseous giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In this dimly lit region, far from our Star's heat and light, these tiny icy moons perform a strange and lovely ballet around their large, gaseous host planets. The quartet of giant gaseous planets, that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs, are enshrouded by heavy atmospheres of gas, and they are accompanied in their travels around our Sun, by their own orbiting entourage of moons and moonlets.

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Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.



Jupiter, like Saturn, is circled by more than 60 known satellites. Many of them are tiny moonlets, measuring only a few miles across, and are probably captured asteroids or minor planets--or their shattered remains.



During a Lunar eclipse the Earth blocks the Full Moon so light from the Sun cannot reach the Moon. We know the Moon reflects the Sun's light so during those moments when that light is blocked it's like the Moon takes a deep breath and holds it. In those moments magic happens. Shifts occur on the consciousness level. Since this Full Moon is in the sign of Capricorn ( Full Moons are always opposite the Sun) and the Sun is in Cancer, the issues of Capricorn and Cancer are up for consideration.. Cancer, ruled by the Moon, is often seen as mothering, female nurturing energy and Capricorn, ruled by Saturn, is the archetypal competitive, goal-oriented male energy. We each have BOTH these energies in our personas.