Planet Mercury Project Ideas 3rd grade jupiter presentation science stem science Planet Mercury Project Ideas

Planet Mercury Project Ideas 3rd grade jupiter presentation science stem science Planet Mercury Project Ideas

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A little interesting about space life.

Dr. Lieber and his colleagues did a study to test the theory of full-moon "lunacy". They studied data on murders in Dade County of Florida which covered 15 years and a total of 1,887 deaths by homicide. When they compared the deaths with the phases of the moon, they found that the two rose and fell together for the entire 15 years! With the approach of a full or new moon, there was a sharp spike in the murder rate, and then a decline during the first and last quarters of the moon.



and here is another

The Burmese month of Kason (April/May), the second month of the Burmese year, has arrived and 'Kason la pyei', the Full-moon of Kason marks an important date for Burmese people, in general, and Burmese Buddhists, in particular. It is a month of commemoration and anticipation. Why this is so you will learn while reading this article.



and finally

Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our Solar System, and the only world beyond our own that we have walked upon, leaving our footprints behind in moon dust as a silent testimony that once we existed, and had been there. Our Moon is both the brightest and largest object in Earth's night sky, and many astronomers think that our bewitching lunar companion was born as a result of an ancient collision between our planet and an ill-fated Mars-sized protoplanet that has been named Theia. There are other theories that have been devised to explain our Moon's origin, but the Giant Impact theory is considered to be the best explanation. When the doomed Theia blasted into the primordial Earth, it launched into the sky above our planet the debris resulting from that catastrophic crash. The debris eventually coalesced into Earth's Moon.

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The research published in the July 4, 2016 issue of Nature Geoscience highlights the main factor differentiating moon-birth around Mars and Earth: the differing rotation speeds of the two planets prompted "completely different tidal actions," Dr. Charnoz explained in the July 4, 2016 CNRS Press Release. Dr. Charnoz proposes that at the time of their respective impacts, "Earth took less than four hours to spin on its axis whereas Mars rotated very slowly over a 24-hour period." The result of this important difference caused Earth to hold on to its single, large Moon, while the Martian collision created a dozen smaller moons alongside a larger moon. As time went by, Martian tidal action--resulting from the planet's slow rotation rate--caused most of the moons, including the largest one, to crash back down to the surface of their parent-planet. As a result, only the two most distant moons, Phobos and Deimos, survived as testimony to the ancient catastrophe.



Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.



According to the new theory, moon-formation starts at the very edge of a planetary ring, where a fragile baby moon can begin to emerge without the danger of being ripped apart by the fierce gravity of its parent planet. These dancing little moonlets, formed from ring-material, then travel outward. As the ring-system continually produces moonlet after moonlet after moonlet, the small icy worlds coalesce to form increasingly larger moons. The larger moons, in turn, may also merge together, as they dance outward from their parent planet.