Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in 1988 pioneer program historic spacecraft Spacecraft Pioneer 6 in 1988

Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in 1988 pioneer program historic spacecraft Spacecraft Pioneer 6 in 1988

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A little interesting about space life.

Earth's bewitching large Moon was probably born as the result of an immense impact, when a Mars-size protoplanet named Theia smashed into Earth about 4.5 billion years ago. This cataclysmic collision is thought to have hurled a vast amount of Earth-stuff and Theia-stuff into orbit around our ancient planet. Debris from the two unfortunate bodies gradually accumulated to give birth to our Moon, as tumbling little newborn moonlets crashed into one another and melded together into one large object.



and here is another

There are several potential explanations that could account for the sea's composition of pure methane, Dr. Le Gall added. "Either Ligeia Mare is replenished by fresh methane rainfall, or something is removing ethane from it. It is possible that the ethane ends up in the undersea crust, or that it somehow flows into the adjacent sea, Kraken Mare, but that will require further investigation," she noted.



and finally

Only some two weeks have passed since 'Yay' (water) played an important role in Burmese people's life. That was when in Tagu (March/April) during 'Thingyan' or 'Water Festival' - the 'Burmese New Year' - the people poured lots of water over one another to wash away all physical filth and dirt and the spiritual sins and evils in order to enter with a clean body and soul into the New Year. Meanwhile we are coping with the heat of the summer as best as we can. All my clothes are dry again and I have recovered from the cold I had caught during that time.

More information:

Moons are natural satellites that orbit another body that, in turn, circles its parent-star. A moon is held in place by both its own gravity and the gravitational grip of its host planet. Some planets have moons; some do not. Several asteroids in our Solar System also are orbited by very small moons--and some dwarf planets, such as Pluto, also have moons. One of Pluto's five moons, Charon, is almost 50% the size of Pluto. For this reason, the two frozen worlds inhabiting our Solar System's remote twilight zone, are sometimes classified as a double-planet.



The February 2018 study, conducted by Carnegie and JPL astronomers, created detailed scenarios in order to determine whether existing theories about the catastrophic Giant Impact theory could explain a wet Moon that is still depleted in other volatile elements like sodium and potassium.



When a moon is in an orbit around its parent-planet, all is well--just as long as the gravity that is holding the moon together in one piece exceeds the powerful, relentless pull of its planet. Alas, if a moon wanders too close, and the tidal forces of the parent-planet exceed the gravitational bind of the unlucky moon, the moon will fall apart. This is termed the Roche limit. Earth's relatively large Moon is a very fortunate natural satellite, and the limit here is a bit under 10,000 kilometers--while our Moon is a safe 385,000 kilometers away from our planet.