Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in 1988 pioneer 6 7 8 9 e 1988 Spacecraft in Pioneer 6

Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in 1988 pioneer 6 7 8 9 e 1988 Spacecraft in Pioneer 6

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A little interesting about space life.

Dr. Rufu and Dr. Canup studied the scenario in which Neptune once, when it was young, had a typical prograde system of moons orbiting it that was similar to those of the other gas giants in our Solar System. The two authors propose that Triton may have originally been a KBO that wandered away from its home in the Kuiper Belt, only to be snared by Neptune. The interactions that resulted from the capture of Triton between retrograde moons and Neptune's original, prograde moons may have then resulted in the destruction of this orderly system, leaving in its wake only the ruthless Triton and Neptune's moons that are still around today.



and here is another

University of Miami psychologist Arnold Lieber states a possible link between the fact that the human body is made up of nearly 80% water to the possibility that we experience "biological tides" effecting our emotions during different phases of the moon, the same as the oceanic tides are effected by the moon's activity.



and finally

The HST images also showed that the moon Kerberos is charcoal black in color, which is in stark contrast to the brilliant white of the other moons of Pluto. It was predicted that dust blasted off the moons by meteorite impacts would blanket the moons, giving them a homogeneous appearance. However, the reason why Kerberos is black remains a mystery.

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How am I so sure of this? Simple. Because I've personally been using the moon to my advantage for more than 20 years, and know how effective it is. Have you ever had one of those epic days fishing where it seemed like no matter what you threw in the water, you caught fish? If you have, it was more than likely due to the fact that the moon was in a certain phase, rather than your skills as an angler (I hate to burst anyone's bubble, but it's true).



The most detailed pictures of Europa show even more intriguing clues that there is slush lurking beneath its brightly shining icy surface. Slightly smaller than Earth's own beloved Moon, Europa's surface temperature could easily freeze an ocean solid over a span of only several million years. However, some astronomers think that warmth from a game of tidal tug-of-war between Europa and Jupiter, as well as other neighboring moons, could be keeping large regions of Europa's subsurface global ocean in a life-friendly liquid state. This process is termed tidal heating, and it refers to a mechanism whereby the gravitational tugs of a nearby object (or objects) flex and bend and contract and expand another object continually. This constant churning causes the victimized object, in this case Europa, to heat up and be considerably more balmy than its great distance from the Sun would otherwise allow it to be.



JAXA has announced a space mission scheduled to begin in 2022, with an expected return to Earth in 2026. "Its objective is to carry out close-up remote sensing and in-situ observations of both Phobos and Deimos, and to bring back samples from Phobos," commented Dr. Ryuki Hyodo in the July 4, 2016 CNRS Press Release. Dr. Hyodo is a planetary scientist, originally from Kobe University in Japan, and he is also currently collaborating with the IPG. "High-resolution impact simulations are still needed to understand more about the disk structure," he continued to explain to the press.