Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in 1988 pioneer 0 1 2 Pioneer 1988 6 Spacecraft in

Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in 1988 pioneer 0 1 2 Pioneer 1988 6 Spacecraft in

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A little interesting about space life.

The Kuiper Belt, sometimes called the Edgeworth-Kuiper Belt, is a region located in our Solar System's outer limits beyond the realm of the eight major planets. It extends from the orbit of Neptune to approximately 50 AU. Neptune's average distance from our Sun is about 30.1 AU--its perihelion is 29.8 AU, while its aphelion is 30.4 AU.



and here is another

A fourth, more recent model, is based on the existence of a synestia. A synestia is a doughnut-shaped cloud composed of vaporized molten rock. This recently discovered inhabitant of the Universe is believed to take shape when planet-sized bodies catastrophically blast into one another with both high energy and angular momentum. Soon after the discovery of these puffy celestial "doughnuts" in 2017, planetary scientists came to the realization that they may have a new way to explain Moon-birth. The ancient collisions, that create a synestia, are so violent that the objects that form from these cosmic crash-ups melt and partially vaporize. Ultimately, after having cooled off sufficiently to solidify, they create (almost) spherical planets, such as those inhabiting our own Solar System.



and finally

Mars may be circled by many moons smaller than 160 to 330 feet in diameter, and a ring of dust has been predicted to circle Mars between Phobos and Deimos.

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"What people frequently forget in this field is that you never have just one big impact. We have to worry about how big the next biggest impact was," and whether that impact blurred the effects of the previous giant impact, he continued to explain.



The more widely accepted theory that the planets and regular moons formed together from the same swirling cloud of gas and dust, works well as an explanation for the larger moons of our Solar System, such as the four Galilean moons--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--orbiting the giant planet Jupiter. However, the multitude of smaller moons, swarming around the giant planets, "have so far been considered a by-product," Dr. Crida commented in the November 29, 2012 Scientific American.



Most of Saturn's natural satellites are very small and icy dancing moonlets. However, the larger, icy midsized moons twirl around their enormous ringed planet in a lovely and mysterious dance. The largest of the icy moons is Rhea, Saturn's second-largest moon after the weird world that is Titan. Iapetus, the third largest of Saturn's moons, is two-faced, with one side composed of gleaming, very bright, highly reflective ice, and the other, dark and non-reflective, a blackened splotch staining the pristine white ice. Iapetus is larger than Mimas and Enceladus. There is an enormous impact crater on the moon Mimas, that stands out as a prominent feature on what is apparently a badly bombarded, heavily cratered world. The large impact crater Herschel on this 400-kilometer moon was excavated by a tumbling chunk of space-stuff made of rock, ice, or both, that came very close to powdering the entire little moon. Another icy moon, Enceladus, is a bewitching world, 500-kilometers in diameter, that is thought to harbor a global subsurface ocean beneath its frozen crust. Where there is liquid water there is always the possibility--though, by no means, the promise--of life. Enceladus also has the highest albedo of any other moon in our Solar System. This means that it has the most dazzlingly bright reflective surface. It also possesses a very active geology, rendering it almost free of craters because it is constantly being resurfaced by the emissions of gushing icy geysers that are responsible for fresh snow that keeps the surface of the little moon sparkling and smooth.