Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in 1988 nasa the pioneer missions 1988 Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in

Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in 1988 nasa the pioneer missions 1988 Pioneer 6 Spacecraft in

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A little interesting about space life.

Almost every moon in our Sun's family of orbiting objects, including Earth's own bewitching, large Moon, rotates on its axis at the same speed as it orbits its parent-planet. It is for this reason that we always observe the same side of our Moon facing us on Earth. But on Pluto, things work a bit differently. Astronomers have now discovered that there are no hidden sides to its moons!



and here is another

The research proposes that the shoreline surrounding Ligeia Mare is possibly porous and may be saturated with liquid hydrocarbons. The data span a period running from local winter to spring, and the astronomers expected that--in a way similar to seasides on Earth--the surrounding solid terrains on Titan would warm much more rapidly than the sea.



and finally

"For decades scientists have thought Jupiter's moon Europa was a likely place for life, but now we have specific, exciting regions on the icy moon to focus our future studies, " Dr. Don Blankenship, senior research scientist at the University of Texas at Austin's Institute for Geophysics, commented in the November 16, 2011 National Geographic News.

More information:

The scientists modeled different temperatures and water abundances that may have been present in the Moon-birthing disk. At higher temperatures, their disk was primarily composed of silicate vapor, which formed as a result of evaporation of the mantles of both the proto-Earth and the doomed Theia. The disk at these higher temperatures also contained a relatively small quantity of hydrogen dissociated from water. In contrast, at lower temperatures, their disk was primarily composed of water, from which hydrogen did not dissociate under this cooler temperature range--thus making its escape mechanism very inefficient.



The crust of Earth's Moon is 43 miles thick on the near-side hemisphere, and 93 miles on the far-side. It is composed of silicon, magnesium, oxygen, calcium, aluminum, and iron. There are also trace amounts of titanium, uranium, thorium, hydrogen, and potassium.



The relatively light regions of the Moon are known as the highlands. The dark features, the lunar maria, are impact basins that were later filled with lava between 4.2 and 1.2 million years ago. These light and dark regions were created by rocks of different ages and compositions. This provides evidence for how the ancient crust may have crystallized from a global lunar ocean of magma. The impact craters have been preserved for billions of years, and they provide observers with an impact history for our Moon and other bodies that inhabit the inner Solar System.