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A little interesting about space life.

However, it's not true that we have no satellite pictures of the moon landing sites. In fact, we have a number of satellites orbiting around the Moon which have taken many pictures of all the landing sites before. These images clearly show the equipment left on the moon by astronauts, their footprints, and all the wheel tracks left by their moon-buggies.



and here is another

The "chaos terrains" are those regions of the icy moon that are covered with shattered, scrambled, and rotated chunks of crust the size several city blocks. Galileo images show swirly and very rough-looking material between the broken blocks of ice, which indicates that the blocks may once have been lodged atop a bed of slushy stuff that ultimately froze at the very frigid surface temperatures of Europa.



and finally

Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our Solar System, and the only world beyond our own that we have walked upon, leaving our footprints behind in moon dust as a silent testimony that once we existed, and had been there. Our Moon is both the brightest and largest object in Earth's night sky, and many astronomers think that our bewitching lunar companion was born as a result of an ancient collision between our planet and an ill-fated Mars-sized protoplanet that has been named Theia. There are other theories that have been devised to explain our Moon's origin, but the Giant Impact theory is considered to be the best explanation. When the doomed Theia blasted into the primordial Earth, it launched into the sky above our planet the debris resulting from that catastrophic crash. The debris eventually coalesced into Earth's Moon.

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The most popular theory of lunar formation suggests that the Moon was born in a monumental collision between a Mars-size object named Theia and the ancient Earth--and that this ancient smash-up would have melted our primordial planet. This model further suggests that more than 40 percent of Earth's Moon is composed of the debris of the tragedy that was Theia. However, more recent theories indicate that our planet suffered from several giant collisions during its formation, with the lunar-forming crash being the last great grand finale event.



Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.



"We think that the giant planets got their satellites kind of like the Sun got its planets, growing like miniature solar systems and ending with a stage of final collisions," lead author Dr. Erik Asphaug, of the University of California at Santa Cruz, said in a statement to the press on October 18, 2012.