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A little interesting about space life.

Moon jellies are the easiest jellyfish to keep alive in captivity. This is because of their diversity in nature. Moon jellies can be found in almost every ocean in the world. Their natural habitat stretches from the equator as far north as 70 latitude and as far south as 40 in every ocean that falls within those geographic parameters.



and here is another

The "lunar effect" is a term used to make a correlation between specific stages of the Earth's lunar cycle and deviant behavior in humans and possibly even animals. This is a pseudoscientific theory, which is one based on science but having no real scientific proof. It is also a theory studied within the realms of sociology, psychology and physiology and has for many centuries been a topic of studies and beliefs. Even the term "lunacy" is derived from the name Luna, a Roman moon goddess.



and finally

The beautiful, banded, blue ice-giant planet, Neptune, is the furthest major planet from the Sun. It is also orbited by a very weird large moon that may not have been born a moon at all. The moon, Triton, is about 1,680 miles in diameter, and sports features that eerily resemble those found on the dwarf planet Pluto. Pluto is a denizen of the Kuiper Belt. The Kuiper Belt is a reservoir of comets and other icy bodies--some large, some small--that circle around our Sun beyond the orbit of Neptune, at a distance of about 30 to 55 Astronomical Units (AU) from our Star. One AU is equal to the average distance of Earth from the Sun--approximately 93,000,000 miles.

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Although Europa was visited by the two spacecraft Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 in the early 1970s, and the twin Voyagers in 1979, these early flybys only produced grainy, dim images. However, these early pictures revealed enough about the little moon to make it intriguing. Pale yellow icy plains were seen in the Voyager images. The plains also tantalizingly displayed red and brown mottled areas. Long cracks were observed, running for thousands of miles over the shattered eggshell-like crust. On Earth, similar cracks would suggest such features as high mountains and deep canyons. But nothing higher than a few kilometers was seen on the moon. In fact, Europa is one of the smoothest bodies in our Solar System.



Earth's Moon is the fifth largest moon in our entire Solar System, as well as the only world beyond our planet that we have visited. Our lunar companion is the largest and brightest object in the sky at night, and many astronomers think that it was born when the tragedy that was the pulverized Theia blasted into ancient Earth billions of years ago. There are other theories, however, that seek to explain how our Moon came to be. Nevertheless, the Giant Impact theory stands its ground as the most credible explanation for lunar birth. When the doomed, destroyed Theia impacted Earth, it shot debris above our planet. This abundant debris eventually coalesced to form our Moon.



"The distribution of these water-rich deposits is the key thing. They're spread across the surface, which tells us that the water found in the Apollo samples isn't a one-off. Lunar pyroclastics seem to be universally water-rich, which suggests the same may be true of the mantle," Dr. Milliken continued to explain in the Brown University Press Release.