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A little interesting about space life.

University of Miami psychologist Arnold Lieber states a possible link between the fact that the human body is made up of nearly 80% water to the possibility that we experience "biological tides" effecting our emotions during different phases of the moon, the same as the oceanic tides are effected by the moon's activity.



and here is another

No Satellite Pictures. Even with all of our telescopes on Earth and the incredibly powerful Hubble Telescope, none of them has ever taken any pictures with any of the landing sites of the Moon. This often misleads us to the thought: are they really out there?



and finally

It is true that even our most powerful telescopes aimed at the landing sites wouldn't see anything. However, not because the Moon landings didn't happen. It is only because of the optical limitations of telescopes themselves, because of their limited size and distance from the Moon.

More information:

In their research, the planetary scientists combined several radar observations of heat given off by Ligeia Mare. They also studied data collected from a 2013 experiment that bounced radio signals off Ligeia Mare. The results of that experiment were presented in a 2014 paper led by Cassini radar team associate Dr. Marco Mastroguiseppe of Cornell University in Ithaca, New York, who also was part of the new study.



In order to shed new light on the mysterious origins of the surviving duo of Martian moons, the researchers conducting this study combined their expertise in astrophysics, planetary science, computer science, and mathematics in order to create complex supercomputer models. The models ran a range of hydrodynamic and numerical simulations able to recreate the sequence of ancient events. Their findings strengthen the hypothesis that a horrific blast in the past formed the moons of Mars--originally a collection of moons and moonlets.



Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.