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A little interesting about space life.

Titan's alien climate--including its heavy hydrocarbon rain and fierce winds--forms surface features that are similar to those on Earth, and it experiences seasonal weather changes--just like our own planet. In fact, with its liquids pooling both on its surface and beneath its surface, along with its mostly nitrogen atmosphere, Titan has a methane cycle that is comparable to Earth's water cycle--although at the much more frosty temperature of about -179.2 degrees Celsius.



and here is another

Over the passage of billions of years, this ceaseless rain of falling objects have pulverized the lunar surface, creating fragments ranging in size from a fine powder to enormous, heavy boulders. Almost the entire lunar surface is literally blanketed by a pile of ground up rubble composed of charcoal gray, powdery dust and rocky debris collectively termed the lunar regolith. Beneath the regolith there is a region composed of shattered bedrock that is called the megaregolith.



and finally

"The key question is whether those Apollo samples represent the bulk conditions of the lunar interior or instead represent unusual or perhaps anomalous water-rich regions within an otherwise 'dry' mantle. By looking at the orbital data, we can examine the large pyroclastic deposits on the Moon that were never sampled by the Apollo or Luna missions. The fact that nearly all of them exhibit signatures of water suggests that the Apollo samples are not anomalous, so it may be that the bulk interior of the Moon is wet," explained Dr. Ralph Milliken in a July 24, 2017 Brown University Press Release. Dr. Milliken is the lead author of the new research and an associate professor in Brown University's Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences. Brown University is in Providence, Rhode Island.

More information:

The new study, which Dr. Milliken co-authored with Dr. Shuai Li, a postdoctoral researcher at the University of Hawaii and a Brown University graduate, is published in the July 24, 2017 issue of the journal Nature Geoscience. The research was part of Dr. Li's doctoral thesis.



In addition, this new study weakens certain theories that some planetary scientists suggest as explanations for the formation of other rocky, terrestrial planets like Venus and Mars, Dr. Jacobson believes.



Two French astrophysicists, proposing the new, alternative scenario explaining moon-birth, reported their findings in a paper titled: Formation of Regular Satellites from Ancient Massive Rings in the Solar System, published in the November 30, 2012 issue of the journal Science. Dr. Aurelien Crida, an astrophysicist at the University of Nice--Sophia Antipolis and the Observatory of Cote d'Azur in France, explained in the November 29, 2012 issue of Scientific American that "It's fundamentally the same process that gave birth to the Moon and to the satellites of the giant planets, and that's the spreading of rings." Dr. Crida is a co-author of the study with Dr. Sebastien Charnoz of the University of Paris--Diderot.

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