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A little interesting about space life.

Dr. Rufu and Dr. Canup studied the scenario in which Neptune once, when it was young, had a typical prograde system of moons orbiting it that was similar to those of the other gas giants in our Solar System. The two authors propose that Triton may have originally been a KBO that wandered away from its home in the Kuiper Belt, only to be snared by Neptune. The interactions that resulted from the capture of Triton between retrograde moons and Neptune's original, prograde moons may have then resulted in the destruction of this orderly system, leaving in its wake only the ruthless Triton and Neptune's moons that are still around today.



and here is another

The true reason you can't see the stars in photos and videos of Moon is not that the stars aren't there, but rather because of the omnipresent sunlight and the exposure limits of cameras.



and finally

"We've found a likely solution to the long-standing problem of how Triton arrived in its peculiar orbit. In addition, this mechanism introduces a new pathway for the capture of satellites by planets that may be relevant to other objects in the Solar System," explained Dr. Craig Agnor, a researcher from the University of California, Santa Cruz, in the May 10, 2006 issue of Time Magazine.

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"Uranus and Neptune and--why not?--systems of satellites around exoplanets that we may identify in the future."



Now, by pinpointing the precise birthday of the Moon, Dr. Jacobson and his team can help to explain why the Moon and our planet are so mysteriously similar in their compositions.



Most of the moons of our Solar System are icy little desolate and dead worlds, dwelling in the dark, cold stillness of those regions far from the warmth and light of our Sun. However, a few of these small bodies may not be lifeless. For example, Europa of Jupiter may have a subsurface global ocean of liquid water secreted beneath its cracked, jumbled frozen crust of ice. This subsurface ocean might be warmed by tidal flexing into a hospitable, life-friendly liquid-water state, where primitive life-forms may swim around in the deep-sea darkness beneath Europa's ice. In addition, the second-largest moon in our Solar System, Titan of Saturn, possesses an environment that is eerily similar to that of our own planet long before life evolved out of the lifeless ooze (prebiotic). Big, lazy raindrops of liquid hydrocarbons float to the surface of this tormented, frigid moon, forming seas and lakes composed of methane and ethane that play the same role as water on Earth. It is entirely possible that life, as we do not know it, can evolve and flourish using liquids other than water. The largest moon of our Solar System, Ganymede of Jupiter, is larger than the innermost planet Mercury. Like its sister-moon Europa, Ganymede may hold secreted, beneath its surface crust of ice, a global ocean of liquid water. The little icy moon, Enceladus of Saturn, spews out geysers of water mixed with ammonia (which plays the role of antifreeze) from its so-called "tiger stripes". Therefore, Enceladus could also harbor life-loving water hidden beneath its icy surface.