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A little interesting about space life.

When once a man and woman get together, their bond is maintained permanently. If a child is born, the mother stays with the baby for three months. During this time the baby is usually breast fed by the mother or sometimes by other mothers. Children including infants are brought up in the community centers. Hence children do not develop social bonding to their parents. In fact nobody knows who their parents are. The moon people laid a very strong emphasis on educating the children and the children are kept in the community education system until they reach 16 years of age. The children learn academic subjects as well as all domestic practical work required for community activities. There are also chores that have to be carried out during non-study time. From a very early age, children are assigned specific responsibilities. The chores are selected suitably by community leaders with due regard to the age of the child. The children select their own names during the school period according to their sole independent choice. However the first part of the name carries the name of the city. For instance children from the city of "Vaaadi" would have names like Vaaadi Tukuuu, Vaaadi Bekiii, Vaaadi Zukooo, etc., - short names but pronounced with a long dragging accent. Written records of births or any other type of identification mechanism does not exist.



and here is another

However, Neptune is wacky. This giant gaseous world has only a small number of moons when compared to the other three gaseous giant planets in our Sun's outer realm: Jupiter, Saturn, and Uranus. Of the quartet of giant planets that inhabit our Sun's outer kingdom, Jupiter and Saturn are classified as gas-giants, while Uranus and Neptune are ice-giants. While all four planets are enormous in size, Jupiter and Saturn are much larger than Uranus and Neptune, and possess much more massive gaseous envelopes. The ice-giants, Uranus and Neptune, are smaller, contain larger solid cores, and sport less massive gaseous envelopes than their two gas-giant planet kin.



and finally

The true reason you can't see the stars in photos and videos of Moon is not that the stars aren't there, but rather because of the omnipresent sunlight and the exposure limits of cameras.

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Kepler-22b is an extrasolar planet that circles Kepler-22, a G-type star that is situated about 600 light-years from our own planet in the constellation Cygnus. This intriguing new world, that resides beyond our Solar System, was first spotted by NASA's highly productive, though ill-fated, Kepler Space Telescope in 2011. Kepler-22b has the distinction of being the first known transiting extrasolar planet to reside within the so-called habitable zone of its star. The habitable zone is the term used to describe that Goldilocks region around a star where water can exist in its life-loving liquid state. Planets dwelling in this fortunate region are not too hot, not too cold, but just right for water and, hence, life to exist. A planet that circles its star in the habitable zone suggests that there is the possibility--though not the promise--of life as we know it to exist on that world.



NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft was the first to visit Titan back in 1980. Although Voyager 1 made a truly heroic journey, it proved unsuccessful in its efforts to obtain close-up pictures of Titan's veiled surface. This adventurous, early space mission was not able to obtain the desired images because it could not cut through the dense orange smog--and the resulting images showed only some minor brightness and color variations in Titan's atmosphere. In 1994, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) did succeed in obtaining some precious and revealing images of Titan's well-hidden surface--showing the existence of a bright and sparkling continent dubbed Xanadu--after the "Xanadu" of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's romantic poem Kubla Khan. Titan's Xanadu glitters as if lit by the cold fires of a multitude of sparkling rhinestones.



Mars hasn't always looked the way it does today. The planet suffered a monumental tilt billions of years ago. Before this great tilt occurred, the Martian poles were not where we see them now.