Nebula Atomic Award Sticker quot118 element color periodic table stars and nebulaquot by Sticker Nebula Atomic Award

Nebula Atomic Award Sticker quot118 element color periodic table stars and nebulaquot by Sticker Nebula Atomic Award

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A little interesting about space life.

Triton is unique among our Solar System's moons of planetary mass. This is because its orbit is retrograde to Neptune's rotation and inclined relative to Neptune's equator. This suggests that Triton was not born in orbit around Neptune, but was instead snared by the giant planet.



and here is another

Clearly, Triton is a bizarre moon-world, circling its giant parent-planet in the wrong direction. As Triton wandered away from its birthplace in the Kuiper Belt, during its journey through the darkness of interplanetary space, it at last ventured close enough to Neptune to feel the powerful lure of its gravitational embrace. As Neptune drew its adopted moon-child closer and closer, the frigid wanderer from afar experienced a sea-change from a comet-like inhabitant of the Kuiper Belt, to a moon of one of the major planets in our Solar System. So, now, Triton inhabits its new home, orbiting the planet Neptune, but orbiting it backwards. And like all moons, wherever they may be, it is now a dependent of its parent-planet. Indeed, Triton was given its name as an allusion to the demigod Triton's dependence on the sea-god Neptune in Greek mythology.



and finally

Almost every moon in our Sun's family of orbiting objects, including Earth's own bewitching, large Moon, rotates on its axis at the same speed as it orbits its parent-planet. It is for this reason that we always observe the same side of our Moon facing us on Earth. But on Pluto, things work a bit differently. Astronomers have now discovered that there are no hidden sides to its moons!

More information:

"Prior to the Hubble observations, nobody appreciated the intricate dynamics of the Pluto system," Dr. Mark Showalter explained in a June 3, 2015 HST Press Release. Dr. Showalter is of the Search for Extraterrestrial Intelligence (SETI) Institute in Mountain View, California. He is lead author of the Nature paper.



By studying how the four inner planets evolved and grew--using more than 250 computer simulations--the planetary scientists discovered that if the Moon-birthing blast had happened early, the quantity of material accreted onto Earth afterward would be enormous. If the impact had occurred late, the amount of material would be relatively small.



Such moon-forming mergers and collisions are not unheard of. For example, the leading theory explaining the formation of Earth's own large Moon, suggests that it was born about 4.5 billion years ago when a Mars-sized protoplanet, dubbed Theia by astronomers, collided with our planet. Just as our Moon is identical geologically to Earth's mantle, the six medium-sized icy sister moons of Saturn are all similar in composition to Titan's icy mantle, the researchers announced in October 2012.