Nebula Atomic Award Sticker novels by award Award Atomic Sticker Nebula

Nebula Atomic Award Sticker novels by award Award Atomic Sticker Nebula

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A little interesting about space life.

The name moon jellyfish is purely descriptive. They are named for the most prominent part of their anatomical makeup, their large disk or full moon shaped bell. They can be further distinguished by the four horseshoe-shaped gonads at the center of their bell. These reproductive organs resemble the craters found on the moon. These fish are very popular as pets because they are transparent and will appear to glow in whatever color is shined through them. They look particularly stunning in an aquarium with an LED fader system set up in it. Another point in their favor is that their stinging cells do not produce enough pressure to pierce human skin. In the wild, a moon jelly's life cycle is limited to one year form start to finish. In captivity they can easily live up to three years. These jellies can grow up to one foot in diameter.



and here is another

Most of the moons dwelling in our Sun's family were probably born from primordial disks of dust and gas, orbiting around newly formed planets, when our Solar System was very young about 4.5 billion years ago. There are at least 150 moons circling the planets in our Solar System--and about 25 moons are currently awaiting official confirmation of their discovery.



and finally

We have known since 1995 that our Solar System is far from unique in the Cosmic scheme of things, and that there are a vast number of planets that circle stars beyond our own Sun. Furthermore, some of these extrasolar planets probably have moons just like most of the planets in our Sun's family. These faraway exomoons are enticing little worlds of wonder and mystery--and possibly even life.

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The 'Board of Trustees' in Yangon organises and conducts an official ceremony to celebrate this day in the context of which a huge processions is led around the great gilded 'Shwedagon Stupa'. The people leading this procession are clad in the garb of celestial beings such as 'Thagyamin' (King of Celestials), the 'Galon/Garuda King' (a mythical being half human and half bird) and the 'Naga' (Serpent King). This much to the religious, the commemoration part of the full-moon day of Kason. But what about the anticipating part mentioned earlier?



Planetary scientists usually calculate the Moon's age by using the radioactive decay of elements like uranium, explained Dr. John Chambers in the April 2, 2014 National Geographic News. Dr. Chambers is a planetary scientist at the Carnegie Institution for Science in Washington, D.C. By studying an element with a recognized decay rate, and knowing its concentration in Moon rocks or the Earth's surface, scientists are able to calculate back in time to when the material first formed. However, there are numerous and varying radioactive materials that can provide differing timelines, added Dr. Chambers, who was not involved in the study.



"Our model explains the diversity of these ice-rich moons and the evidence for their very active geology and dynamics. It also explains a puzzling fact about Titan, in that a giant impact would give it a high orbital eccentricity," Asphaug continued to explain to the press on October 18, 2012.