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A little interesting about space life.

If the authors' proposal is correct, then it successfully explains why Neptune's moon system looks so strange compared to Jupiter's or Saturn's--which means that astronomers' models of how these primordial systems form around gaseous giant worlds still hold strong.



and here is another

Pluto itself is a relatively large denizen of the distant Kuiper Belt, that orbits our Sun in the frigid company of a vast multitude of other bewitching and mysterious icy objects. Like other Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), Pluto is thought to be composed primarily of ice and rock. It is an intriguing frozen "oddball", a mere 1/6 the mass of Earth's own Moon and 1/3 its volume. Pluto also has a highly inclined, eccentric orbit that carries it from 30 to 49 Astronomical Units (AU) from our Sun. One AU is equal to the mean Earth-Sun separation of 93,000,000 miles. As a result, Pluto periodically moves towards our Sun at a distance that is closer to our Star than Neptune. Very fortunately for both Neptune and Pluto, an orbital resonance with Neptune prevents the duo from crashing into each other.



and finally

For most of the 20th century, astronomers thought that Pluto was a lonely little world, a solitary ball of ice circling our Sun, so very far from the comforting warmth and delightful light of our brilliant Star. However, in 1992, the discovery of the first KBO (other than Pluto), made astronomers come to the realization that Pluto is not far from the madding crowd of a vast population of other Kuiper Belt ice balls.

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Planetary scientists believed for years that Earth's Moon is depleted of water and other volatile compounds. However, this idea began to change in 2008, when a team of scientists announced that they had detected traces of water in some of the volcanic glass beads carried back to Earth from the Apollo 15 and 17 missions to the Moon. In 2011, additional study of extremely small crystalline formations within those beads revealed that they contain amounts of water that are similar to some basalts on Earth. This indicates that the lunar mantle--at least, part of it--contains as much water as Earth's.



"More generally, our findings clarify how giant impacts give birth to satellites and can create a diverse variety of satellite systems," Dr. Charnoz told the press on July 4, 2016. He added that the team could apply their method to other regions of our Universe:



A moon is a natural body that is in orbit around another body that circles our Sun. The moon is kept in its orbit by its host's gravity, as well as by the gravity of the moon itself. Some planets host moons; some do not. Some asteroids have moons, and some dwarf planets--such as Pluto--are also circled by moons.