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A little interesting about space life.

For most of the 20th century, astronomers thought that Pluto was a lonely little world, a solitary ball of ice circling our Sun, so very far from the comforting warmth and delightful light of our brilliant Star. However, in 1992, the discovery of the first KBO (other than Pluto), made astronomers come to the realization that Pluto is not far from the madding crowd of a vast population of other Kuiper Belt ice balls.



and here is another

As for Triton--it's a doomed world. It circles around its parent planet in the wrong direction, and as it does so it moves ever closer and closer inward. Eventually, Triton will crash into Neptune!



and finally

Legend has it that A) the day he was born as Prince Siddhartha Gautama in ca. 563 B.C., B) the day of his 'Great Enlightenment' under the Bodhi tree (Tree of Enlightenment) in ca. 533 B.C. and C) the day of his death, i.e. his passing on to 'Nibbana' or 'Parinibanna' (a state of neither being existent nor non-existent that to reach is Buddhism's ultimate goal) as 'Buddha', meaning the 'Enlightened One' in ca. 483 B.C. fell all on a full-moon day, the day celebrated by the Burmese Buddhists as full-moon day of Kason. For this reason this day is also called 'Thrice Blessed Day' or 'Three-fold Anniversary'. Subsequently the 'Full-moon Day of Kason' marks the three main events of Siddhartha Gautama Buddha's life and as such it is celebrated in a fitting manner by Burmese Buddhists all over the country.

More information:

Earth's lunar companion is thought to have been born about 4.51 billion years ago, according to a recent study. This means that our Moon was born soon after Earth's formation in the primeval Solar System. The average distance of Earth's Moon from our planet is about 238,900 miles--or approximately 1.28 light-seconds--and it is in synchronous rotation with Earth, always showing the same face, with the near side famous for its beautiful bewitching dark volcanic maria (Latin for seas) that are situated between prominent impact craters and the bright, very ancient, crustal highlands. Our Moon's surface is actually quite dark, even though it appears in the sky at night to be very bright, with a reflectance only a bit higher than that of old asphalt. The prominent position of our Moon in our planet's night sky, as well as its regular cycle of phases, have made our nearest and dearest celestial companion a valuable cultural influence since ancient times in art, mythology, language, and on calendars.



Therefore, the planetary ring-spreading model can explain how the majority of regular moons were born in our Solar System.



"We think that the giant planets got their satellites kind of like the Sun got its planets, growing like miniature solar systems and ending with a stage of final collisions," lead author Dr. Erik Asphaug, of the University of California at Santa Cruz, said in a statement to the press on October 18, 2012.