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A little interesting about space life.

How am I so sure of this? Simple. Because I've personally been using the moon to my advantage for more than 20 years, and know how effective it is. Have you ever had one of those epic days fishing where it seemed like no matter what you threw in the water, you caught fish? If you have, it was more than likely due to the fact that the moon was in a certain phase, rather than your skills as an angler (I hate to burst anyone's bubble, but it's true).



and here is another

Mystifying, bewitching, and swathed in a heavy, dense shroud of orange hydrocarbon mist, Titan circles its immense gas-giant parent-planet, Saturn, and is a remarkable world in its own right. Slashed by strange rivers and seas of ethane, methane, and propane, and pelted by large and lazy drops of hydrocarbon rain, Titan is an eerie, tormented, and mysterious moon-world orbiting its magnificent and beautiful ringed parent-planet, in the distant outer realm of the giants--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The four enormous and gaseous wonderland worlds are unlike the quartet of much smaller rocky denizens of the inner Solar System--Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. Because of its dense orange blanket of smog, the geological features of Titan's surface were hidden from the prying eyes of curious astronomers until 2004 when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander finally arrived there--and started to unveil its long-hidden face. In April 2016, a team of planetary scientists announced yet another important revelation about this moon-world--a large sea on Titan is composed primarily of pure liquid methane, with the seabed itself possibly well-coated in a sludge of carbon-and nitrogen-rich material, as well as showing strange shores surrounded by wetlands.



and finally

The research proposes that the shoreline surrounding Ligeia Mare is possibly porous and may be saturated with liquid hydrocarbons. The data span a period running from local winter to spring, and the astronomers expected that--in a way similar to seasides on Earth--the surrounding solid terrains on Titan would warm much more rapidly than the sea.

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However, this did not prove to be the case. Instead, Cassini's measurements did not suggest any great difference in temperature between the surrounding shore and the methane sea over this span of time. This finding indicates that the terrains surrounding the lakes and seas on Titan are wet with liquid hydrocarbons, which would cause them to warm up and cool down in much the same way as the methane sea itself.



Now, by pinpointing the precise birthday of the Moon, Dr. Jacobson and his team can help to explain why the Moon and our planet are so mysteriously similar in their compositions.



Asphaug and co-author Dr. Andreas Reufer of the University of Bern in Switzerland, devised their new giant impact model using sophisticated computer simulations. They discovered that mergers between moons the size of Jupiter's Galilean satellites--which range in size from 1,940 miles wide (Europa) to 3, 271 miles across (Ganymede)--would tear icy stuff off the outer layers of the colliding moons. This icy material would then form spiral arms, which would ultimately merge together due to gravitational attraction to create Saturn's mid-sized icy moons.

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