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A little interesting about space life.

Judith E. Braffman-Miller is a writer and astronomer whose articles have been published since 1981 in various newspapers, journals, and magazines. Although she has written on a variety of topics, she particularly loves writing about astronomy because it gives her the opportunity to communicate to others the many wonders of her field. Her first book, "Wisps, Ashes, and Smoke," will be published soon.



and here is another

With the discoveries of 132 confirmed extrasolar planets and more than three thousand planet candidates, the Kepler mission revolutionized scientific understanding of planets residing beyond our own Star. Much of the attention surrounding these discoveries has focused on identifying an Earth-analog--a planet about the size of our own world dwelling within the precious Goldilocks zone around its distant star. Now, for the first time, Dr. David M. Kipping of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and his team, have started to hunt for a habitable moon around Kepler-22b!



and finally

Gravity can pull binary systems apart when the sister objects travel too close to a massive body--such as the planet Neptune. The orbital motions of the two sister objects results in one member traveling slower than the other. This can disrupt the system and permanently alter the orbital companion. This mechanism is termed an exchange reaction, and it could have shot Triton into a number of different orbits around Neptune, Agnor continued.

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Ever since their discovery in 1877, Phobos and Deimos have both bewildered and bewitched astronomers trying to answer the question of how Mars ended up with its duo of misshapen little moons. However, this perplexing riddle might have been solved by a multidisciplinary study conducted by French, Belgian, and Japanese scientists.



"What people frequently forget in this field is that you never have just one big impact. We have to worry about how big the next biggest impact was," and whether that impact blurred the effects of the previous giant impact, he continued to explain.



This model attempts to explain the distribution of moons circling giant, gaseous planets dwelling in the outer limits of our Solar System. However, it also provides an explanation for how the moons of planets such as our Earth and the dwarf planet, Pluto, were born. This research provides a valuable clue about how planetary systems developed throughout the entire Universe--not only in our own Solar System.