Nebula Atomic Award Sticker 13 best images about ra awards books movies plays tv Sticker Nebula Atomic Award

Nebula Atomic Award Sticker 13 best images about ra awards books movies plays tv Sticker Nebula Atomic Award

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A little interesting about space life.

Triton was the second moon in our Solar System that was found to have a substantial atmosphere, which is primarily composed of nitrogen--with smaller quantities of carbon monoxide and methane. Discovered by William Lassell in 1846, only seventeen days after the discovery of Neptune, Triton is one of the most frigid worlds in our Solar System, with a surface temperature of only about 38 Kelvin. Triton's frozen surface is coated by nitrogen, carbon dioxide, methane, and water ices, and it has a high geometric albedo of more than 70%. Surface features include a large southern polar cap, ancient cratered planes that are cross-cut by scarps and graben, as well as much younger features thought to have been formed by endogenic processes like cryovolcanism (ice volcanoes).



and here is another

Numerical simulations have been conducted that show that there is a 0.41 probability that Neptune's moon Halimede blasted into Nereid in the past. Even though it is not known if this collision really did occur, both moons display similar grey colors. This implies that Halimede could be a chunk of Nereid that broke off during the collision.



and finally

The harmful effects of radiation are based both on its strength and the time of exposure to its source. Average human would need to spend nearly four months inside the Van Allen belts to accumulate a lethal dose. The astronauts managed to pass through them during less than one hour. Regarding the time spent out of Earth's magnetic field, where the astronauts were exposed to solar radiation, an average human could endure a radiation exposure equivalent to one-way trip to Mars and still not receive a dose which exceeds lifetime levels set up by NASA.

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We have known since 1995 that our Solar System is far from unique in the Cosmic scheme of things, and that there are a vast number of planets that circle stars beyond our own Sun. Furthermore, some of these extrasolar planets probably have moons just like most of the planets in our Sun's family. These faraway exomoons are enticing little worlds of wonder and mystery--and possibly even life.



Our Earth basks comfortably in the sunny, warmer, inner regions of our Solar System, and our Moon is the largest one of its kind, in this region, relatively close to our Star. Of the four rocky, terrestrial planets--of which our Earth is a member--Mercury and Venus are moonless, and Mars sports two small, misshapen little rocky moons, Phobos and Deimos, that are likely captured refugees from the main asteroid belt that circles our Sun between the orbits of Mars and Jupiter.



According to this theory, the Saturn system began with a family of several relatively large moons, analogous to the four large Galilean moons of Jupiter--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto. However, strange and violent things happened in the Saturn system that drove its large moons onto a collision course with destiny. According to the theory, there were a few dramatic moon mergers, forming the Titan that we now know--but there was also a sufficiently large quantity of moon-stuff left over from the collisions to create the icy mid-sized satellites--Mimas, Iapetus, Enceladus, Tethys, Dione, and Rhea!

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