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NASA Storm Watch nasa asteroid tracker an asteroid will skim earth today NASA Storm Watch

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A little interesting about space life.

Almost every moon in our Sun's family of orbiting objects, including Earth's own bewitching, large Moon, rotates on its axis at the same speed as it orbits its parent-planet. It is for this reason that we always observe the same side of our Moon facing us on Earth. But on Pluto, things work a bit differently. Astronomers have now discovered that there are no hidden sides to its moons!



and here is another

Jupiter, the largest planet in our Solar System, also has the largest moon--Ganymede. A large number of Jovian moons sport highly elliptical orbits and also circle backwards--that is, opposite to the spin of their planet. Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune also sport such so-called irregular moons, that orbit far from their respective parent planets.



and finally

Triton also possesses a thin atmosphere composed mainly of nitrogen, and a smaller quantity of methane. This atmosphere probably is the result of Triton's cryovolcanism, which is enhanced by seasonal heating from the Sun. Although little is currently known of Pluto's atmosphere, it is thought to be primarily composed of nitrogen with some carbon monoxide and methane added to the mix--and it is extremely tenuous. Pluto's very thin atmosphere may exist as a gas only when Pluto is nearest to the Sun (perihelion). For most of Pluto's very long year, the atmospheric gases are frozen in the form of ice on its extremely frigid surface. One year on Triton is almost 248 Earth-years long--or 90,471 Earth-days!

More information:

Moons are natural satellites that orbit another body that, in turn, circles its parent-star. A moon is held in place by both its own gravity and the gravitational grip of its host planet. Some planets have moons; some do not. Several asteroids in our Solar System also are orbited by very small moons--and some dwarf planets, such as Pluto, also have moons. One of Pluto's five moons, Charon, is almost 50% the size of Pluto. For this reason, the two frozen worlds inhabiting our Solar System's remote twilight zone, are sometimes classified as a double-planet.



This new method is based on the fact that elements composing our planet's crust that have a tendency to combine with iron--such as iridium and platinum--arrived at Earth after this last giant collision.



According to the new theory, moon-formation starts at the very edge of a planetary ring, where a fragile baby moon can begin to emerge without the danger of being ripped apart by the fierce gravity of its parent planet. These dancing little moonlets, formed from ring-material, then travel outward. As the ring-system continually produces moonlet after moonlet after moonlet, the small icy worlds coalesce to form increasingly larger moons. The larger moons, in turn, may also merge together, as they dance outward from their parent planet.