NASA Science Experiments nasa to grow plants on the moon space agency will sow Experiments NASA Science

NASA Science Experiments nasa to grow plants on the moon space agency will sow Experiments NASA Science

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A little interesting about space life.

The "people" do not live above or on the ground as we do on earth but down below under the surface. They live in an enormous inner space naturally formed as a labyrinth of gigantic caves below the surface crust. The surface crust forms the roof of the caves and varies in thickness from a lower limit around three feet up to a maximum reaching a hundred feet. In spite of the many manned missions to the moon, nobody was able to discover the fact that the moon was the closest world to earth with a wide variety of life forms, including people in very many ways similar to us. These people have been living sub-terra or underground in the moon for millions of years. They also arrived at their present form after going through an evolutionary process similar to what took place on earth. Their social structure and behavioral traits are unimaginably different from those of the people on earth.



and here is another

For most of the 20th century, astronomers thought that Pluto was a lonely little world, a solitary ball of ice circling our Sun, so very far from the comforting warmth and delightful light of our brilliant Star. However, in 1992, the discovery of the first KBO (other than Pluto), made astronomers come to the realization that Pluto is not far from the madding crowd of a vast population of other Kuiper Belt ice balls.



and finally

Saturn, along with its frozen retinue of icy rings, dazzling moons, and sparkling moonlets, orbits our Sun about ten times farther out than the Earth. Astronomers received their first collection of detailed data about Titan when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander arrived there in 2004. The Huygens lander successfully obtained revealing images when it drifted down to Titan's tormented, hydrocarbon-slashed surface, as well as when it was still floating slowly and softly down through the moon's thick, foggy, orange atmosphere--which has 1.4 times greater pressure than that of our own planet. These pictures, when combined with other studies using instruments aboard the Cassini orbiter, reveal to curious planetary scientists that Titan's geological features include lakes and river channels filled with methane, ethane, and propane. Titan's strange surface also shows mountains and sand dunes--and it is pockmarked by craters. The rippling dunes form when fierce winds sweep up loose particles from the surface and then tosses them downwind. However, the sands of Titan are not like the sands on our Earth. Titan's "sand" is both bizarre and alien, probably composed of very small particles of solid hydrocarbons--or, possibly, ice imprisoned within hydrocarbons--with a density of about one-third that of the sand on our own planet. Furthermore, Titan's gravity is low. In fact, it is only approximately one-seventh that of Earth. This means that, working in combination with the low density of Titan's sand particles, they carry only the small weight of a mere four percent that of terrestrial sand. Titan's "sand" is about the same light-weight as freeze-dried grains of coffee!

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NASA's Voyager 1 spacecraft was the first to visit Titan back in 1980. Although Voyager 1 made a truly heroic journey, it proved unsuccessful in its efforts to obtain close-up pictures of Titan's veiled surface. This adventurous, early space mission was not able to obtain the desired images because it could not cut through the dense orange smog--and the resulting images showed only some minor brightness and color variations in Titan's atmosphere. In 1994, the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) did succeed in obtaining some precious and revealing images of Titan's well-hidden surface--showing the existence of a bright and sparkling continent dubbed Xanadu--after the "Xanadu" of Samuel Taylor Coleridge's romantic poem Kubla Khan. Titan's Xanadu glitters as if lit by the cold fires of a multitude of sparkling rhinestones.



The Cassini-Huygens mission is a collaborative NASA/European Space Agency/Italian Space Agency robotic spacecraft that is observing the Saturn system. The spacecraft was initially constructed to sport two components: One is the European Space Agency-designed Huygens Probe named in honor of the Dutch mathematician and astronomer Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695), who discovered Titan. Huygens also studied the rings of Saturn. The second component, the NASA-designed Cassini Orbiter, was named for the Italian-French astronomer Giovanni Dominico Cassini (1625-1712) who discovered four of Saturn's other moons. After a long, difficult journey through interplanetary space, that took it from Earth to Saturn, Cassini-Huygens finally reached the realm of the ringed planet on July 1, 2004. On December 25, 2004, the Huygens Probe was deliberately severed from the Cassini Orbiter, and began its descent down to the long-veiled and hidden surface of Titan--sending back, to waiting astronomers on Earth, an abundance of valuable information about the mysterious moon-world. Titan, at last, had its hidden face unveiled--revealing its well-kept secrets. The mission will continue until 2017.



Born approximately 4.51 billion years ago, Earth's companion world formed soon after our own planet's birth in the primordial Solar System. The average separation between Earth and Moon is about 238,000 miles (1.28 light-seconds), and it is locked in synchronous rotation with Earth--meaning that it always shows us the same face. The near-side of our Moon is known for its bewitching dark volcanic maria (Latin for seas) that are located between large impact craters, as well as for its very ancient, bright crustal highlands. The lunar surface is really extremely dark--even though it appears to be very bright in the night sky above our planet--with a reflectance only a bit higher than that of old asphalt. The prominent position of our lunar companion in the dark midnight sky, as well as its rhythmic and regular cycle of phases, made our Moon an important influence on human culture ever since ancient times--especially in mythology, art, language, and on calendars.