NASA Science Experiments nasa teachers astronauts share 39neat39 qualities NASA Experiments Science

NASA Science Experiments nasa teachers astronauts share 39neat39 qualities NASA Experiments Science

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A little interesting about space life.

Galileo Galilei first spotted the planet Neptune with his primitive "spyglass" on December 28, 1612. He observed it again on January 27, 1613. Unfortunately, on both occasions, Galileo thought that the giant, remote planet was a fixed star, appearing near the planet Jupiter in the dark night sky. Because of this mistake, Galileo is not credited with the discovery of Neptune.



and here is another

During the 2013 experiment, the radar instrument spotted echoes emanating from the seafloor and determined the depth of Ligeia Mare along Cassini's track over that strange methane sea. This represented the first-ever detection of the bottom of an extraterrestrial sea. The astronomers were amazed to find that depths in this distant, alien sea were as great as 525 feet at the deepest point along the track the radar pointed.



and finally

Born approximately 4.51 billion years ago, Earth's companion world formed soon after our own planet's birth in the primordial Solar System. The average separation between Earth and Moon is about 238,000 miles (1.28 light-seconds), and it is locked in synchronous rotation with Earth--meaning that it always shows us the same face. The near-side of our Moon is known for its bewitching dark volcanic maria (Latin for seas) that are located between large impact craters, as well as for its very ancient, bright crustal highlands. The lunar surface is really extremely dark--even though it appears to be very bright in the night sky above our planet--with a reflectance only a bit higher than that of old asphalt. The prominent position of our lunar companion in the dark midnight sky, as well as its rhythmic and regular cycle of phases, made our Moon an important influence on human culture ever since ancient times--especially in mythology, art, language, and on calendars.

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To help solve this mystery, Dr. Jacobson and his team devised supercomputer simulations of the growth of our Solar System's inner quartet of rocky, terrestrial planets out of the protoplanetary accretion disk swirling around our young Sun, from which the planetary building blocks, the planetesimals, eventually formed.



Saturn has 62 known moons. Most of them are very small, icy worldlets. On June 11, 2004, shortly before arriving at Saturn, the Cassini spacecraft made its only flyby--at an altitude of 2,000 kilometers--past the very tiny icy moon Phoebe. Phoebe is a heavily cratered worldlet that circles its planet backwards--indicating that it is a captured object, born elsewhere, and not an original member of Saturn's family.



So whether you're sailing down Moon River or giving a good howl, take a good look at the Moon, our guidepost to the monthly cycle of our lives.