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NASA Science Experiments buzz aldrin deploys apollo 11 experiments nasa Science Experiments NASA

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A little interesting about space life.

University of Miami psychologist Arnold Lieber states a possible link between the fact that the human body is made up of nearly 80% water to the possibility that we experience "biological tides" effecting our emotions during different phases of the moon, the same as the oceanic tides are effected by the moon's activity.



and here is another

Multiple Light Sources. On the moon, there is only one light source sufficiently strong to form shadows; the Sun. So it is solid to suggest that all shadows on the Moon should run parallel to each other. However, this was apparently not the case during the moon landing.



and finally

Until 1610, when Galileo Galilei discovered the quartet of large Galilean moons orbiting Jupiter--Io, Europa, Ganymede, and Callisto--Earth's Moon was the Moon, because it was the only moon known to exist. Now, we know differently. There are over 100 known moons in our Solar System alone, and probably many, many more, circling distant alien planets belonging to the families of stars beyond our Sun. Most of the moons in our own Solar System are relatively small, icy worldlets that contain only small amounts of rocky material. The faraway multitude of sparkling, frozen moons that inhabit our Sun's family are mostly found circling the quartet of outer gaseous giant planets--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. In this dimly lit region, far from our Star's heat and light, these tiny icy moons perform a strange and lovely ballet around their large, gaseous host planets. The quartet of giant gaseous planets, that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs, are enshrouded by heavy atmospheres of gas, and they are accompanied in their travels around our Sun, by their own orbiting entourage of moons and moonlets.

More information:

Moons are natural satellites that circle around another body that, in turn, circles around its parent-star. The moon is held in place by both its own gravity and the gravitational pull of its planet. Some planets have moons, while others do not. Several asteroids are known to be circled by very small moons, and some dwarf planets--such as Pluto--also have moons. One of Pluto's quintet of moons, Charon, is about half the size of Pluto itself. Some planetary scientists propose that Charon is really a large chunk of Pluto that was torn off in a catastrophic collision with another wandering world long ago. Because Charon is almost 50% the size of Pluto, the two tiny icy bodies are sometimes considered to be a double-planet.



Earth's Moon is a brilliant, beguiling, bewitching companion world. The largest and brightest object in our planet's night sky, it has for eons been the source of wild magical tales, myths, and poetry--as well as an ancient symbol for romantic love. Some traditional tales tell of a man's face etched on its bright surface, while still others whisper haunting childhood stories of a "Moon Rabbit". Lovely, ancient, and fantastic stories aside, Earth's Moon is a real object, a large rocky sphere that has been with our planet almost from the very beginning, when our Solar System was first forming over four billion years ago. But where did Earth's Moon come from? In April 2014, a team of planetary scientists announced that they had pinned down the birth date of the Moon to within 100 million years of the formation of our Solar System, and this new discovery indicates that Earth's Moon was most likely born about 4.47 billion years ago in a gigantic collision between a Mars-sized object and the primordial Earth.



This revised birth date for the Moon comes from a new study that takes a detour from the long-standing debate about its true age, and is basically in agreement with those planetary scientists who suggest a late-forming Moon. The new method that the scientists used to arrive at their conclusion eliminates numerous problems with traditional methods for calculating the Moon's age.