NASA Science Experiments apollo 11 seismic experiment moon nasa science Science NASA Experiments

NASA Science Experiments apollo 11 seismic experiment moon nasa science Science NASA Experiments

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A little interesting about space life.

Moon jellies are the easiest jellyfish to keep alive in captivity. This is because of their diversity in nature. Moon jellies can be found in almost every ocean in the world. Their natural habitat stretches from the equator as far north as 70 latitude and as far south as 40 in every ocean that falls within those geographic parameters.



and here is another

For most of the 20th century, astronomers thought that Pluto was a lonely little world, a solitary ball of ice circling our Sun, so very far from the comforting warmth and delightful light of our brilliant Star. However, in 1992, the discovery of the first KBO (other than Pluto), made astronomers come to the realization that Pluto is not far from the madding crowd of a vast population of other Kuiper Belt ice balls.



and finally

Judith E. Braffman-Miller is a writer and astronomer whose articles have been published since 1981 in various newspapers, journals, and magazines. Although she has written on a variety of topics, she particularly loves writing about astronomy because it gives her the opportunity to communicate to others the many wonders of her field. Her first book, "Wisps, Ashes, and Smoke," will be published soon.

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Lack of Stars. Another famous argument for the moon landing hoax is a total lack of stars in the photographic and video evidence - even in the photos and videos of high quality. Here on Earth, when there's a black sky, there is always a lot of stars, so the videos must have been shot on a film stage. Right? Not so fast...



During the 2013 experiment, the radar instrument spotted echoes emanating from the seafloor and determined the depth of Ligeia Mare along Cassini's track over that strange methane sea. This represented the first-ever detection of the bottom of an extraterrestrial sea. The astronomers were amazed to find that depths in this distant, alien sea were as great as 525 feet at the deepest point along the track the radar pointed.



The research published in the July 4, 2016 issue of Nature Geoscience highlights the main factor differentiating moon-birth around Mars and Earth: the differing rotation speeds of the two planets prompted "completely different tidal actions," Dr. Charnoz explained in the July 4, 2016 CNRS Press Release. Dr. Charnoz proposes that at the time of their respective impacts, "Earth took less than four hours to spin on its axis whereas Mars rotated very slowly over a 24-hour period." The result of this important difference caused Earth to hold on to its single, large Moon, while the Martian collision created a dozen smaller moons alongside a larger moon. As time went by, Martian tidal action--resulting from the planet's slow rotation rate--caused most of the moons, including the largest one, to crash back down to the surface of their parent-planet. As a result, only the two most distant moons, Phobos and Deimos, survived as testimony to the ancient catastrophe.