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A little interesting about space life.

"Pluto will continue to surprise us when New Horizons flies past it in July (2015). Our work with Hubble just gives us a foretaste of what's in store," Dr. Showalter commented to the press on June 3, 2015.



and here is another

The 'Board of Trustees' in Yangon organises and conducts an official ceremony to celebrate this day in the context of which a huge processions is led around the great gilded 'Shwedagon Stupa'. The people leading this procession are clad in the garb of celestial beings such as 'Thagyamin' (King of Celestials), the 'Galon/Garuda King' (a mythical being half human and half bird) and the 'Naga' (Serpent King). This much to the religious, the commemoration part of the full-moon day of Kason. But what about the anticipating part mentioned earlier?



and finally

Some of the images focus on the shallow center of a bizarre impact crater dubbed Pwyll. Impact rays and shattered pieces of material scattered over an immense area of the moon tell the tale of a sizeable meteorite that collided violently with Europa relatively recently--"only" about 10 to 100 million years ago. There is also darker debris chaotically scattered around Pwyll. This further suggests that the large crashing meteorite may have dug up some deeply buried material, and tossed it helter-skelter around the crater.

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Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.



In 2010 and 2011, the French astrophysicists devised their model to explain how the moons of Saturn were born. They based their findings on data derived from the Cassini probe--that is investigating the Saturn-system--and on numerical simulations. The team found that Saturn's bewitching rings, which are slender disks composed of tiny chunks of gleaming ice surrounding the giant planet, gave rise to the icy moons. This happened because the rings spread as time went by--and when the rings attained a critical distance from the planet (termed the Roche limit), their ends melded together and created small worldlets that broke off and floated away. In this way the rings created the icy moons orbiting Saturn.



Therefore, the planetary ring-spreading model can explain how the majority of regular moons were born in our Solar System.