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A little interesting about space life.

For most of the 20th century, astronomers thought that Pluto was a lonely little world, a solitary ball of ice circling our Sun, so very far from the comforting warmth and delightful light of our brilliant Star. However, in 1992, the discovery of the first KBO (other than Pluto), made astronomers come to the realization that Pluto is not far from the madding crowd of a vast population of other Kuiper Belt ice balls.



and here is another

"Their motion is tied together in a way similar to that of three of Jupiter's large moons. If you were sitting on Nix, you would see Styx go around Pluto twice every time Hydra goes around three times," Dr. Hamilton commented in the June 3, 2015 HST Press Release.



and finally

The Cassini-Huygens mission is a collaborative NASA/European Space Agency/Italian Space Agency robotic spacecraft that is observing the Saturn system. The spacecraft was initially constructed to sport two components: One is the European Space Agency-designed Huygens Probe named in honor of the Dutch mathematician and astronomer Christiaan Huygens (1629-1695), who discovered Titan. Huygens also studied the rings of Saturn. The second component, the NASA-designed Cassini Orbiter, was named for the Italian-French astronomer Giovanni Dominico Cassini (1625-1712) who discovered four of Saturn's other moons. After a long, difficult journey through interplanetary space, that took it from Earth to Saturn, Cassini-Huygens finally reached the realm of the ringed planet on July 1, 2004. On December 25, 2004, the Huygens Probe was deliberately severed from the Cassini Orbiter, and began its descent down to the long-veiled and hidden surface of Titan--sending back, to waiting astronomers on Earth, an abundance of valuable information about the mysterious moon-world. Titan, at last, had its hidden face unveiled--revealing its well-kept secrets. The mission will continue until 2017.

More information:

Although Europa was visited by the two spacecraft Pioneer 10 and Pioneer 11 in the early 1970s, and the twin Voyagers in 1979, these early flybys only produced grainy, dim images. However, these early pictures revealed enough about the little moon to make it intriguing. Pale yellow icy plains were seen in the Voyager images. The plains also tantalizingly displayed red and brown mottled areas. Long cracks were observed, running for thousands of miles over the shattered eggshell-like crust. On Earth, similar cracks would suggest such features as high mountains and deep canyons. But nothing higher than a few kilometers was seen on the moon. In fact, Europa is one of the smoothest bodies in our Solar System.



Our Moon makes a complete orbit around Earth in 27 Earth days and it rotates (spins) at that same rate--meaning, in that same amount of time. Because our planet is also moving--rotating on its axis as it circles our Star--from our viewpoint, our lunar companion appears to circle us ever 29 days.



A moon is a natural body that is in orbit around another body that circles our Sun. The moon is kept in its orbit by its host's gravity, as well as by the gravity of the moon itself. Some planets host moons; some do not. Some asteroids have moons, and some dwarf planets--such as Pluto--are also circled by moons.