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Curious facts about cosmic life and their inhabitants.

When Apollo 11 landed on the Moon in 1969, we were presented with our first human contact with the moon. The mission was able to accomplish the task of not only landing on the Moon, but also to return to the Earth with samples from the Moon. These samples along with subsequent presented us with answers regarding the composition of the Moon, which also gave us some basic facts that any theory about how the moon was created must answer/address. We learned:The Moon does not contain an iron core like our Earth does, due to the fact that the Moon's density is only 3.34 grams per cubic centimeter (compared to the Earth's which is 5.52 grams per cubic centimeter).Samples collected from the surface of the Moon reveal that it underwent extreme heat and baking, much more than what the Earth experienced.



and here is another

On July 20, 1969, during one of the defining moments of the human history, Neil Armstrong became the first man to step on the surface of Earth's Moon. In his own words, it was truly "one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind."



and finally

It is true that even our most powerful telescopes aimed at the landing sites wouldn't see anything. However, not because the Moon landings didn't happen. It is only because of the optical limitations of telescopes themselves, because of their limited size and distance from the Moon.

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The efforts of planetary scientists to determine the lunar birthday have suggested a range of ages. Some have proposed an early event, about 30 million years after our Solar System formed, while others suggested that it occurred over 50 million years and perhaps as much as 100 million years after our Sun's family took shape.



Following the final giant impact that was responsible for lunar-birth, the Earth's mantle should have been depleted of iridium, platinum, and other similar elements. Although these elements still dwell in Earth's mantle, only small quantities remain. This indicates that only a small amount of material accreted onto Earth after the Moon-forming blast by the doomed Theia. Any such elements lingering in the Earth's crust that "love iron" arrived after that horrendous collision.



Two French astrophysicists, proposing the new, alternative scenario explaining moon-birth, reported their findings in a paper titled: Formation of Regular Satellites from Ancient Massive Rings in the Solar System, published in the November 30, 2012 issue of the journal Science. Dr. Aurelien Crida, an astrophysicist at the University of Nice--Sophia Antipolis and the Observatory of Cote d'Azur in France, explained in the November 29, 2012 issue of Scientific American that "It's fundamentally the same process that gave birth to the Moon and to the satellites of the giant planets, and that's the spreading of rings." Dr. Crida is a co-author of the study with Dr. Sebastien Charnoz of the University of Paris--Diderot.