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Curious facts about cosmic life and their inhabitants.

Some studies which have been performed in certain cities within the United States show that there is no correlation between the full moon phase and such things as a rise in suicides, crime rate, dog bites or births. And yet, other studies completed by such individuals as psychologists and other human behaviorists have shown that there is, in fact, a peak in certain kinds of behavior associated with a loss of contact with reality during full moons. These include murder, arson, dangerous driving and kleptomania, which is an irresistible impulse to steal due to an emotional rather than economical need.



and here is another

In a mysterious region beyond the orbit of the beautiful, banded, blue ice-giant planet Neptune--the most distant of the eight major planets from our Sun--there is a dark and frigid domain called the Kuiper Belt. Within this remote region, where our Sun shines with only a weak fire, and appears to be merely a particularly large star suspended in the black sky, a multitude of strange, icy worldlets tumble around our Star. Pluto, a large icy denizen inhabiting the Kuiper Belt, was originally classified as the ninth major planet from our Sun after its discovery in 1930. However, with the realization that this frozen "oddball" is really only one of several large, icy inhabitants of the Kuiper Belt, the International Astronomical Union (IAU) found it necessary to formally define "planet" in 2006--and poor Pluto was unceremoniously ousted from the pantheon of major planets. Pluto, now freshly reclassified as a dwarf planet, nonetheless remains a small world of great interest, debate, and affection. Scientists will soon learn much more about this beloved, distant, ice-ball so far away, when, after a treacherous nine-year journey of three million miles through interplanetary space, NASA's hearty New Horizons spacecraft arrives at Pluto on July 14, 2015.



and finally

The scientists modeled different temperatures and water abundances that may have been present in the Moon-birthing disk. At higher temperatures, their disk was primarily composed of silicate vapor, which formed as a result of evaporation of the mantles of both the proto-Earth and the doomed Theia. The disk at these higher temperatures also contained a relatively small quantity of hydrogen dissociated from water. In contrast, at lower temperatures, their disk was primarily composed of water, from which hydrogen did not dissociate under this cooler temperature range--thus making its escape mechanism very inefficient.

More information:

"Uranus and Neptune and--why not?--systems of satellites around exoplanets that we may identify in the future."



"This means that at the atomic level, the Earth and the Moon are identical. This new information challenged the giant impact theory for lunar formation," study lead author Dr. Seth Jacobson told Space.com on April 2, 2014. Dr. Jacobson is a planetary scientist at the Cote d'Azur Observatory in Nice, France.



"I think the best thing about this work is that they explain this link between the mass of the moon and the orbital distance, which was known before but not understood," said planetary scientist, Dr. David Nesvorny, in the November 29, 2012 Scientific American. Dr. Nesvorny, of the Southwest Research Institute in Boulder, Colorado, who did not contribute to the new research, added that "If you had asked me a few years ago, I would think of our Moon's formation and the formation of the satellites of the outer planets differently. This puts things on common ground."

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