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Curious facts about cosmic life and their inhabitants.

The "people" do not live above or on the ground as we do on earth but down below under the surface. They live in an enormous inner space naturally formed as a labyrinth of gigantic caves below the surface crust. The surface crust forms the roof of the caves and varies in thickness from a lower limit around three feet up to a maximum reaching a hundred feet. In spite of the many manned missions to the moon, nobody was able to discover the fact that the moon was the closest world to earth with a wide variety of life forms, including people in very many ways similar to us. These people have been living sub-terra or underground in the moon for millions of years. They also arrived at their present form after going through an evolutionary process similar to what took place on earth. Their social structure and behavioral traits are unimaginably different from those of the people on earth.



and here is another

Images of Europa taken by Galileo in 1997 provide some important evidence suggesting that Europa may be slushy just beneath its glistening cracked icy crust--and possibly even warmer at greater depths. This evidence includes an oddly shallow impact crater, chunky-looking textured blocks of surface material that tantalizingly resemble icebergs on Earth, and openings in the surface where new icy crust appears to have formed between continent-sized plates of ice.



and finally

Now we know that there are over 100 moons circling the eight major planets of our Sun's family. The majority of our Solar System's moons are icy, small, and frozen worlds that contain only small quantities of rocky material. The distant multitude of sparkling, icy moons in our Solar System are primarily in orbit around the four giant gaseous planets, Here, in this strange, frigid and dimly-lit realm, far from our Star's melting fires and brilliant light, these tiny frozen moons do their fabulous, lovely dance around their quartet of parent-planets. The giant, gaseous worlds that inhabit our Solar System's outer suburbs--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune--are blanketed by heavy atmospheres of gas, and are accompanied, in their travels around our Star, by their orbiting retinue of many moons and sparkling, icy moonlets.

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The discovery that the hidden interior of Earth's Moon contains water raises some interesting questions concerning lunar formation. Most planetary scientists think that our Moon was born from the debris left behind after the catastrophic collision of our primordial planet with the tragedy that was Theia. This collision would have occurred very early in our Solar System's history. However, one of the reasons scientists had proposed that the lunar interior should be dry is that it is unlikely that the hydrogen necessary to create water could have survived following the ferocious heat of that ancient impact.



According to the new theory, moon-formation starts at the very edge of a planetary ring, where a fragile baby moon can begin to emerge without the danger of being ripped apart by the fierce gravity of its parent planet. These dancing little moonlets, formed from ring-material, then travel outward. As the ring-system continually produces moonlet after moonlet after moonlet, the small icy worlds coalesce to form increasingly larger moons. The larger moons, in turn, may also merge together, as they dance outward from their parent planet.



"Our model explains the diversity of these ice-rich moons and the evidence for their very active geology and dynamics. It also explains a puzzling fact about Titan, in that a giant impact would give it a high orbital eccentricity," Asphaug continued to explain to the press on October 18, 2012.