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A little interesting about space life.

Our third theory to discuss is the "Co-Formation Theory" which alleges that the Moon and Earth were formed within the nebular disk around the Earth (similar to how our solar system formed around the Sun). This theory falls short when one revisits the composition of the Earth and Moon. If the Moon did indeed share some of the same building material as the Earth did and form in the same area, it should be very similar in composition to the Earth. We've seen, however, that the Moon doesn't share a significant iron core like our home planet does. There is one theory which remains to be discussed, and it is the one that is widely accepted today. The Giant Impactor Theory: The Giant Impactor Theory claims that the Moon was formed when an object the size of Mars slammed into the Earth shortly after the solar system's formation. After this object hit the Earth, tons of material from both the object and the Earth were sent into space and began to orbit around the Earth. This material slowly began to come together and collide until what we see as our Moon was created. This theory most easily explains the criteria we previously mentioned. The heat that would have been generated after the collision explains the evidence of "baking" on the Moon's surface. It also supports the fact that the Moon doesn't have a large iron core like the Earth. Finally, we have seen evidence of other such collisions in other parts of the solar system.



and here is another

To make the flag stand still on the moon, the flag was actually made from plastic material, similar to the one that tents are usually made of. For practical reasons, the flag was originally folded to maximize space and stored in a thin tube. After Neil Armstrong planted it to the surface of the Moon, it briefly appeared to move as it was unfolding itself to its final shape.



and finally

The outer Solar System is more richly endowed with moons than the inner regions. The two enormous gas giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, and the ice giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, have numerous moons of various sizes, shapes, and origins. As these enormous planets grew, during the early days of our Solar System, they were able to ensnare wandering objects with their mighty gravitational grips.

More information:

With the discoveries of 132 confirmed extrasolar planets and more than three thousand planet candidates, the Kepler mission revolutionized scientific understanding of planets residing beyond our own Star. Much of the attention surrounding these discoveries has focused on identifying an Earth-analog--a planet about the size of our own world dwelling within the precious Goldilocks zone around its distant star. Now, for the first time, Dr. David M. Kipping of the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics (CfA) in Cambridge, Massachusetts, and his team, have started to hunt for a habitable moon around Kepler-22b!



Astronomers suspected for a very long time that Triton was not born a moon of Neptune, but was instead a luckless refugee from elsewhere that had been kidnapped by its planet. It was not until 2006, however, that a convincing theory explaining how Triton was ensnared by its adoptive parent was proposed. This theory suggests that Triton once had a companion as it orbited the Sun. According to this scenario, Neptune's strong gravitational embrace tugged Triton away from its sister world. This research was reported in the May 11, 2006 issue of the journal Nature.



Until 2004, no spacecraft had visited Saturn in over two decades. Pioneer 11 had snapped the very first close-up images of Saturn when it flew past in 1979, Voyager 1 had its rendezvous about a year later, and in August 1981 Voyager 2 had its brief but highly productive encounter. At last, on July 1, 2004, NASA's Cassini spacecraft went into orbit around Saturn, and started taking breathtaking photographs.