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Interesting facts about space.

Dr. Rufu and Dr. Canup studied the scenario in which Neptune once, when it was young, had a typical prograde system of moons orbiting it that was similar to those of the other gas giants in our Solar System. The two authors propose that Triton may have originally been a KBO that wandered away from its home in the Kuiper Belt, only to be snared by Neptune. The interactions that resulted from the capture of Triton between retrograde moons and Neptune's original, prograde moons may have then resulted in the destruction of this orderly system, leaving in its wake only the ruthless Triton and Neptune's moons that are still around today.



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Mystifying, bewitching, and swathed in a heavy, dense shroud of orange hydrocarbon mist, Titan circles its immense gas-giant parent-planet, Saturn, and is a remarkable world in its own right. Slashed by strange rivers and seas of ethane, methane, and propane, and pelted by large and lazy drops of hydrocarbon rain, Titan is an eerie, tormented, and mysterious moon-world orbiting its magnificent and beautiful ringed parent-planet, in the distant outer realm of the giants--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The four enormous and gaseous wonderland worlds are unlike the quartet of much smaller rocky denizens of the inner Solar System--Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. Because of its dense orange blanket of smog, the geological features of Titan's surface were hidden from the prying eyes of curious astronomers until 2004 when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander finally arrived there--and started to unveil its long-hidden face. In April 2016, a team of planetary scientists announced yet another important revelation about this moon-world--a large sea on Titan is composed primarily of pure liquid methane, with the seabed itself possibly well-coated in a sludge of carbon-and nitrogen-rich material, as well as showing strange shores surrounded by wetlands.



and finally

Earth's Moon is our planet's closest neighbor in space, but it is remarkable how even neighbors can keep secrets from each other. For years, astronomers thought that Earth's Moon was barren of water and other volatile compounds, but this notion began to change in 2008, when a team of planetary scientists announced that they had discovered small quantities of water imprisoned within volcanic glass beads, that astronauts had carried back to Earth from the Apollo 13 and 17 missions to our Moon. In 2011, additional research revealed extremely tiny crystalline formations within those beads--indicating that they contained quantities of water similar to some basalts on Earth.

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The inner Solar System is dramatically different from the distant realm of the giant planets. The inner region of our Solar System, where our Earth is situated, is almost entirely moon-less. Of the four relatively small, rocky worlds--Mercury, Venus, our Earth, and Mars--Mercury and Venus are barren of moons, and Mars is orbited by two fascinating, but very small, potato-shaped moons named Phobos and Deimos. The duo of Martian moons are often considered to be captured asteroids that long ago escaped from their birthplace in the Main Asteroid Belt between Mars and Jupiter. According to this scenario, Phobos and Deimos, during their dangerous journey from their original home, were snared by the gravity of their adopted Red Planet when our 4.56 billion-year-old Solar System was young. In the warm and well-lit inner Solar System, only Earth's large Moon is a significant moon-world in its own right.



Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.



Mars was born a few million years after the formation of our Solar System, while Earth took much longer. If Venus formed on a timeline similar to that of Mars, then that would be a "huge puzzle" since Venus and Earth are so similar in terms of mass and orbit," Dr. Jacobson explained in the April 2, 2014 National Geographic News.