Earth-like Planet Super nasa finds three super earths in stars habitable zones Earth-like Super Planet

Earth like Planet Super nasa finds three super earths in stars habitable zones Earth like Super Planet

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Aside from studies, scientifically or other, police officers and hospital staff are the ones who deal with crime, injuries, alcoholism, drug overdose, murder and suicides and many of them will admit that they do notice more of these problems during a full moon. But is that due to some metaphysical connection or due to the fact that moonlit nights are more conducive to outdoor activities, staying up later than usual, being more active, drinking more, etc?



and here is another

The HST images also showed that the moon Kerberos is charcoal black in color, which is in stark contrast to the brilliant white of the other moons of Pluto. It was predicted that dust blasted off the moons by meteorite impacts would blanket the moons, giving them a homogeneous appearance. However, the reason why Kerberos is black remains a mystery.



and finally

Some of the images focus on the shallow center of a bizarre impact crater dubbed Pwyll. Impact rays and shattered pieces of material scattered over an immense area of the moon tell the tale of a sizeable meteorite that collided violently with Europa relatively recently--"only" about 10 to 100 million years ago. There is also darker debris chaotically scattered around Pwyll. This further suggests that the large crashing meteorite may have dug up some deeply buried material, and tossed it helter-skelter around the crater.

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The scientists modeled different temperatures and water abundances that may have been present in the Moon-birthing disk. At higher temperatures, their disk was primarily composed of silicate vapor, which formed as a result of evaporation of the mantles of both the proto-Earth and the doomed Theia. The disk at these higher temperatures also contained a relatively small quantity of hydrogen dissociated from water. In contrast, at lower temperatures, their disk was primarily composed of water, from which hydrogen did not dissociate under this cooler temperature range--thus making its escape mechanism very inefficient.



"The key question is whether those Apollo samples represent the bulk conditions of the lunar interior or instead represent unusual or perhaps anomalous water-rich regions within an otherwise 'dry' mantle. By looking at the orbital data, we can examine the large pyroclastic deposits on the Moon that were never sampled by the Apollo or Luna missions. The fact that nearly all of them exhibit signatures of water suggests that the Apollo samples are not anomalous, so it may be that the bulk interior of the Moon is wet," explained Dr. Ralph Milliken in a July 24, 2017 Brown University Press Release. Dr. Milliken is the lead author of the new research and an associate professor in Brown University's Department of Earth, Environmental and Planetary Sciences. Brown University is in Providence, Rhode Island.



Several theories have been around for a long time that have attempted to explain how Earth's Moon was born. The first theory suggests that the Moon was once part of Earth, and that it somehow budded off about 4.5 billion years ago. According to this theory, the Pacific Ocean basin is the most likely site for where this occurred. A second theory postulates that the interaction of Sun-orbiting and Earth-orbiting planetesimals (the ancient building-blocks of planets), in the early years of our Solar System, caused them to disintegrate. Earth's Moon then coalesced out of the shattered debris of the pulverized planetesimals. A third theory proposes that the Earth and Moon were born together out of the original nebula that gave rise to our Solar System, and a fourth theory suggests that the Moon was really born somewhere else in our Solar System, and was ultimately captured by Earth's gravity when it traveled too close.