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Blue Nebula Nasa blue nebula elements this image furnished stock photo Nebula Nasa Blue

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Interesting facts about space.

Numerical simulations have been conducted that show that there is a 0.41 probability that Neptune's moon Halimede blasted into Nereid in the past. Even though it is not known if this collision really did occur, both moons display similar grey colors. This implies that Halimede could be a chunk of Nereid that broke off during the collision.



and here is another

Kepler-22b is an extrasolar planet that circles Kepler-22, a G-type star that is situated about 600 light-years from our own planet in the constellation Cygnus. This intriguing new world, that resides beyond our Solar System, was first spotted by NASA's highly productive, though ill-fated, Kepler Space Telescope in 2011. Kepler-22b has the distinction of being the first known transiting extrasolar planet to reside within the so-called habitable zone of its star. The habitable zone is the term used to describe that Goldilocks region around a star where water can exist in its life-loving liquid state. Planets dwelling in this fortunate region are not too hot, not too cold, but just right for water and, hence, life to exist. A planet that circles its star in the habitable zone suggests that there is the possibility--though not the promise--of life as we know it to exist on that world.



and finally

Moons are natural satellites that orbit another body that, in turn, circles its parent-star. A moon is held in place by both its own gravity and the gravitational grip of its host planet. Some planets have moons; some do not. Several asteroids in our Solar System also are orbited by very small moons--and some dwarf planets, such as Pluto, also have moons. One of Pluto's five moons, Charon, is almost 50% the size of Pluto. For this reason, the two frozen worlds inhabiting our Solar System's remote twilight zone, are sometimes classified as a double-planet.

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This later-forming time line for lunar birth is reasonable, Dr. William Hartmann noted in the April 2, 2014 National Geographic News. Dr. Hartmann, a researcher at the Planetary Science Institute in Tucson, Arizona, was one of the first to propose the giant impact theory of lunar formation. However, he added that the new study might depend too much on the idea of using the last giant impact as a marker for when such events occurred in the history of our planet.



He added that "In our model for the Saturn system, we propose that Titan grew in a couple of giant impacts, each one combining the masses of the colliding bodies, while shedding a small family of middle-sized moons."



So whether you're sailing down Moon River or giving a good howl, take a good look at the Moon, our guidepost to the monthly cycle of our lives.