Are All a Scale of Planets the planets in our solar system in order of size of All Planets a Are Scale

Are All a Scale of Planets the planets in our solar system in order of size of All Planets a Are Scale

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Interesting facts about space.

The Waving Flag. According to this argument, frequently cited by the people who think that the moon landings were nothing more but a hoax, is that the star-spangled banner of the United States of America seemed to wave and flutter as Neil Armstrong planted it to the ground. This wouldn't have been much of an issue except for the fact that there is virtually no atmosphere on the moon, and therefore no wind whatsoever to have such an effect on any flag.



and here is another

The outer Solar System is more richly endowed with moons than the inner regions. The two enormous gas giant planets, Jupiter and Saturn, and the ice giant planets, Uranus and Neptune, have numerous moons of various sizes, shapes, and origins. As these enormous planets grew, during the early days of our Solar System, they were able to ensnare wandering objects with their mighty gravitational grips.



and finally

Moons are natural satellites that circle around another body that, in turn, circles around its parent-star. The moon is held in place by both its own gravity and the gravitational pull of its planet. Some planets have moons, while others do not. Several asteroids are known to be circled by very small moons, and some dwarf planets--such as Pluto--also have moons. One of Pluto's quintet of moons, Charon, is about half the size of Pluto itself. Some planetary scientists propose that Charon is really a large chunk of Pluto that was torn off in a catastrophic collision with another wandering world long ago. Because Charon is almost 50% the size of Pluto, the two tiny icy bodies are sometimes considered to be a double-planet.

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The lunar mantle reaches from the top of the partially molten layer to the bottom of the lunar crust. It is thought to be made up of minerals like pyroxine and olivine--both of which are composed of magnesium, iron, silicon and oxygen atoms.



The Giant-Impact Theory, alternatively termed the Theia Impact, or Big Splash Theory, proposes that Earth's Moon was born from the debris remaining from a catastrophic collision, that occurred about 4.3 billion years ago, between the primordial Earth and an unfortunate protoplanet, that was about the size of Mars. The Earth's Moon-forming collision would have occurred when our Solar System was still forming during the Hadean eon. The Hadean eon occurred about 20 to 100 million years after our Solar System emerged from its frigid, dark natal cloud of gas and dust. The doomed impacting protoplanet, often called Theia, received its name in honor of a Titan in Greek mythology who was the mother of Selene, the Moon goddess. An analysis of lunar rocks, published in 2016, indicates that this catastrophic crash was a direct hit--causing a thorough mixing of both Earth-stuff and Theia-stuff. The Giant-Impact Theory is the favored scientific explanation for the birth of Earth's Moon.



Asphaug and co-author Dr. Andreas Reufer of the University of Bern in Switzerland, devised their new giant impact model using sophisticated computer simulations. They discovered that mergers between moons the size of Jupiter's Galilean satellites--which range in size from 1,940 miles wide (Europa) to 3, 271 miles across (Ganymede)--would tear icy stuff off the outer layers of the colliding moons. This icy material would then form spiral arms, which would ultimately merge together due to gravitational attraction to create Saturn's mid-sized icy moons.