Are All a Scale of Planets nothing but monkey business space our solar system Are Scale of All a Planets

Are All a Scale of Planets nothing but monkey business space our solar system Are Scale of All a Planets

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Interesting facts about space.

Pluto itself is a relatively large denizen of the distant Kuiper Belt, that orbits our Sun in the frigid company of a vast multitude of other bewitching and mysterious icy objects. Like other Kuiper Belt Objects (KBOs), Pluto is thought to be composed primarily of ice and rock. It is an intriguing frozen "oddball", a mere 1/6 the mass of Earth's own Moon and 1/3 its volume. Pluto also has a highly inclined, eccentric orbit that carries it from 30 to 49 Astronomical Units (AU) from our Sun. One AU is equal to the mean Earth-Sun separation of 93,000,000 miles. As a result, Pluto periodically moves towards our Sun at a distance that is closer to our Star than Neptune. Very fortunately for both Neptune and Pluto, an orbital resonance with Neptune prevents the duo from crashing into each other.



and here is another

On July 20, 1969, during one of the defining moments of the human history, Neil Armstrong became the first man to step on the surface of Earth's Moon. In his own words, it was truly "one small step for a man, one giant leap for mankind."



and finally

There probably are many more lakes under Europa's ice, Blankenship continued to note. Furthermore, the prospects of searching for life on Europa could greatly improve. This is because research indicates that a percentage of the icy lids that cover the embedded lakes may be considerably thinner than was previously supposed.

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When a moon is in an orbit around its parent-planet, all is well--just as long as the gravity that is holding the moon together in one piece exceeds the powerful, relentless pull of its planet. Alas, if a moon wanders too close, and the tidal forces of the parent-planet exceed the gravitational bind of the unlucky moon, the moon will fall apart. This is termed the Roche limit. Earth's relatively large Moon is a very fortunate natural satellite, and the limit here is a bit under 10,000 kilometers--while our Moon is a safe 385,000 kilometers away from our planet.



However, the theory that has long been held to be the most likely explanation is the giant impact theory, suggesting that the Mars-sized body named Theia smashed into the ancient Earth billions of years ago. The monumental blast resulted in a portion of the primordial Earth's crust to be hurled off screaming into Space. This ancient catastrophe tossed a multitude of somersaulting moonlets into the sky, and some of this material was ultimately captured into orbit around the ancient Earth about 4.5 billion years ago, where it finally was pulled together by the force of gravity to become the Moon.



"Our model explains the diversity of these ice-rich moons and the evidence for their very active geology and dynamics. It also explains a puzzling fact about Titan, in that a giant impact would give it a high orbital eccentricity," Asphaug continued to explain to the press on October 18, 2012.