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1909 Penny On Rover Mars nasa39s curiosity rover looks pretty rough after two years on mars photos huffpost On Mars 1909 Rover Penny

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Kepler-22b, with its radius almost two and a half times that of Earth, is too large to be considered a true Earth-analog. Nevertheless, if it possesses an Earth-sized moon, the planetary system could still host a habitable world like our own.



and here is another

Mystifying, bewitching, and swathed in a heavy, dense shroud of orange hydrocarbon mist, Titan circles its immense gas-giant parent-planet, Saturn, and is a remarkable world in its own right. Slashed by strange rivers and seas of ethane, methane, and propane, and pelted by large and lazy drops of hydrocarbon rain, Titan is an eerie, tormented, and mysterious moon-world orbiting its magnificent and beautiful ringed parent-planet, in the distant outer realm of the giants--Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. The four enormous and gaseous wonderland worlds are unlike the quartet of much smaller rocky denizens of the inner Solar System--Mercury, Venus, Earth, and Mars. Because of its dense orange blanket of smog, the geological features of Titan's surface were hidden from the prying eyes of curious astronomers until 2004 when the Cassini/Huygens orbiter and lander finally arrived there--and started to unveil its long-hidden face. In April 2016, a team of planetary scientists announced yet another important revelation about this moon-world--a large sea on Titan is composed primarily of pure liquid methane, with the seabed itself possibly well-coated in a sludge of carbon-and nitrogen-rich material, as well as showing strange shores surrounded by wetlands.



and finally

Titan's alien climate--including its heavy hydrocarbon rain and fierce winds--forms surface features that are similar to those on Earth, and it experiences seasonal weather changes--just like our own planet. In fact, with its liquids pooling both on its surface and beneath its surface, along with its mostly nitrogen atmosphere, Titan has a methane cycle that is comparable to Earth's water cycle--although at the much more frosty temperature of about -179.2 degrees Celsius.

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During the 2013 experiment, the radar instrument spotted echoes emanating from the seafloor and determined the depth of Ligeia Mare along Cassini's track over that strange methane sea. This represented the first-ever detection of the bottom of an extraterrestrial sea. The astronomers were amazed to find that depths in this distant, alien sea were as great as 525 feet at the deepest point along the track the radar pointed.



When a moon is in an orbit around its parent-planet, all is well--just as long as the gravity that is holding the moon together in one piece exceeds the powerful, relentless pull of its planet. Alas, if a moon wanders too close, and the tidal forces of the parent-planet exceed the gravitational bind of the unlucky moon, the moon will fall apart. This is termed the Roche limit. Earth's relatively large Moon is a very fortunate natural satellite, and the limit here is a bit under 10,000 kilometers--while our Moon is a safe 385,000 kilometers away from our planet.



This model attempts to explain the distribution of moons circling giant, gaseous planets dwelling in the outer limits of our Solar System. However, it also provides an explanation for how the moons of planets such as our Earth and the dwarf planet, Pluto, were born. This research provides a valuable clue about how planetary systems developed throughout the entire Universe--not only in our own Solar System.